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I want to build a mySQL query, which returns all nodes in a graph in x depth from a given node. The depth will be only 2-4.

The table structure is (neighborIDs can contain multiple values):

Id  Name  Desc  neighborIDs

So the task is basically a Breadth-first search in mySQL. I have found a way to do it in T-SQL, is this possible in mySQL? Is a single SQL query better, than writing a PHP function, that runs a simple SELECT on every neighbour of a node (so basically making tons of simple queries)?

Thanks for help


A try:

SELECT  root.ID,
        d1.ID,
        d2.ID
FROM    Locations root
        LEFT JOIN Locations d1 ON
          root.neighborIDs LIKE CONCAT('%',d1.id,'%')
        LEFT JOIN Locations d2 ON
          d1.neighborIDs LIKE CONCAT('%',d2.id,'%')
WHERE root.id = 1  # i guess this defines the starting node for the search..

An example table is:

id   name   desc                   neighborIDs  
1    id1    --     
2    id2    ---        
3    id3    neighborours are 1,2   1,2  
4    id4    neighbour is 3         3
10   id10   neigh is 4             4

If i run the query with the input id=1, it should return the row with id=3 if the BFS goes 1 level deep.


Another try:

SELECT id,neighborIDs
FROM locations
WHERE id = 3
OR
neighborIDs LIKE '%3%'
OR (SELECT neighborIDs FROM locations WHERE id = 3) LIKE CONCAT('%',id,'%')

This query selects the neighbors of the node with id = 3.

share|improve this question
1  
You've started out making your life difficult by putting multiple values into neighbourIDs. As a result, any solution requires decomposing the list, and restricts potential benefits from indexing. –  Craig Young Mar 18 '11 at 20:24
    
Then how would you store neighbor IDs? –  sydd Mar 18 '11 at 20:32
2  
Using an association table. (Id, NeighbourId) Each neighbour is represented in a separate row. E.g. Using 'neighbour Integers': (1,0) (1,2) (2,1) (2,3) (3,2) (3,4) ... –  Craig Young Mar 18 '11 at 20:39
    
@sydd: With the data you provide, it seems the graph is directed. @Craig: assumed you had an undirected graph (where if 1 is neighbour of 3, then 3 is neighbour 1 too). –  ypercube Apr 6 '11 at 18:00
    
@ypercube The graph is undirected, just its stored in this (bad) way. I cant change the DB layout unfortunately. –  sydd Apr 6 '11 at 18:03

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted
+50

step 0: Create a view that shows all neighbour pairs

CREATE VIEW neighbour AS
( SELECT loc1.id AS a
       , loc2.id AS b
  FROM locations loc1
     , locations loc2
  WHERE FIND_IN_SET(loc1.id, loc2.neighbours)>0
     OR FIND_IN_SET(loc2.id, loc1.neighbours)>0
) ;

step 1: Find neighbours of depth 1

SELECT b AS depth1
FROM neighbour
WHERE a = 1;               <-- for root with id=1

step 2: Find neighbours of depth 2

SELECT DISTINCT d2.b AS depth2
FROM neighbour d1
  JOIN neighbour d2
    ON d1.b = d2.a
      AND d2.b != 1
WHERE d1.a = 1                <-- for root with id=1
  AND d2.b NOT IN
     ( SELECT b AS depth1     <- depth1 subquery
       FROM neighbour
       WHERE a = 1            <-- for root with id=1
      )
;

step 3: Find neighbours of depth 3

SELECT d3.b as depth3
FROM neighbour d1
  JOIN neighbour d2
    ON d1.b = d2.a
    AND d2.b != 1
    AND d2.b NOT IN
       ( SELECT b as depth1
         FROM neighbour
         WHERE a = 1
       )
  JOIN neighbour d3
    ON d2.b = d3.a
    AND d3.b != 1
WHERE d1.a = 1
  AND d3.b NOT IN
     ( SELECT b as depth1
       FROM neighbour
       WHERE a = 1
      )
  AND d3.b NOT IN
     ( SELECT d2.b AS depth2
       FROM neighbour d1
         JOIN neighbour d2
           ON d1.b = d2.a
           AND d2.b != 1
       WHERE d1.a = 1
         AND d2.b NOT IN
            ( SELECT b AS depth1
              FROM neighbour
              WHERE a = 1
            )
     )
;

As you can see, the growth is exponential for the number of query lines, so I won't try the level 4.

share|improve this answer
    
woah so this really is a difficult question... ill try to understand it. –  sydd Apr 6 '11 at 19:16
    
It's difficult because recursion is not easy to handle in SQL and certainly not in MySQL. Other RDBMS are better in this aspect. –  ypercube Apr 6 '11 at 19:27
    
But Craig's solution with the LEFT JOINs is fairly good. It can be easily adapted to many levels as well. Only problem is that with many levels, there will be duplication or ids in the results, like the root id appearing in levels2 and deeper, depth1 ids appearing in level 2, etc. –  ypercube Apr 6 '11 at 19:29
    
It would be easier to write a PROCEDURE that handles such a search. And far more readable. –  ypercube Apr 6 '11 at 19:38
    
@sydd: Reading the article in the link you have (about a T-SQL solution), shows that indeed a procedure is far better for such problems. You can try to adapt one of those for MySQL. (you can use the neighbour view to have the graph in a more standard form than the original table. –  ypercube Apr 6 '11 at 19:47

As mentioned in my comment, you've made your life difficult. But something similar to the following will produce a list of neighbour IDs at each depth. Depending on your exact needs, the result set can be used a subquery and manipulated further to necessary (such as retrieving the names of the neighbours).

SELECT  root.ID,
        d1.ID,
        d2.ID
FROM    Locations root
        LEFT JOIN Locations d1 ON
          root.Neighbours LIKE '%'+CAST(d1.ID as varchar)+'%'  --Or equivalent mysql pattern matching function
        LEFT JOIN Locations d2 ON
          d1.Neighbours LIKE '%'+CAST(d2.ID as varchar)+'%'

EDIT: Changed INNER JOIN to LEFT JOIN

share|improve this answer
    
How does the Locations table look like? and the d1 and d2 tables? –  sydd Mar 18 '11 at 21:13
    
You didn't name your table with (Id, Name, Desc, neighborIDs) so I called it Locations. d1 and d2 are not tables, they're aliases to reference the Locations table. This is needed because the query joins the Locations table back to itself, and without the aliases, the column references would be ambiguous. PS: It would be easy to repeat the pattern to drill down to a depth of 3 or 4. –  Craig Young Mar 19 '11 at 9:52
    
thanks for answering, ill try to implement it –  sydd Mar 19 '11 at 11:00
    
I've tried to implement it and its not working. the query does not return nodes without children. –  sydd Apr 4 '11 at 1:22
1  
@sydd: turn thej INNER JOINs into LEFT JOINs. –  ypercube Apr 4 '11 at 19:41

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