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Reading the code for a project, I noticed this situation, there are two classes as the following example:


class A {
    private class E aE;
    private class F aF;

    public A(){
        aE = new E();
        aF = new F();
    }

    public void foo1(){
        aE.bar();
        ...
        aF.poo();
    }
}

class B implements Runnable {
    private class E aE;
    private class F aF;

    public B(){
        aE = new E();
        aF = new F();
    }

    public void run(){
        ...
        x = aE.bar()
        ...
    }

}

I would refactoring this code in order to get a superclass A, but along this way it is better to make fields aE and aF protected in class A and use them in class B or add two methods in class A as getE() and getF() and use this method in class B ?

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3 Answers

class B doesn't extend A, it appears to be a simple copy-paste job with the methods needed for implementing Runnable. You clearly should avoid that and make another class which sole purpose is running the application, you probably won't need class B after that.

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Mark, From this example it is difficult to point out how you should refactor this code. Here are some possibilities -

  1. Whether to have a common parent class for A and B depends upon whether there is an logical parent-child relationship between actual classes.

  2. You can also extend class B from A if there is a relationship. You will have to expose aE and aF as public properties in that case.

  3. Another possibility is you can implement Runnable on A itself, eliminating class B.

  4. If it is very common to have both class E and F as private fields together, then you can consider encapsulating them in one type, say EF, and then compose other classes with that class.

However, the correct answer can be given only after knowing what the actual classes are.

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Any statement about classes named 'A' and 'B' likely doesn't have enough context to be either wrong or right.

But I would, assuming a case in which it was reasonable to have a B extending A, almost always prefer to use protected or package-level data member access. If you have an interface that is formal and serious enough to use Get/Set accessors, you are probably outside the context in which implementation inheritance is a good design choice.

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