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I have an instrument that stores timestamps the microsecond level, and I need to store those timestamps as part of collecting information from the instrument. Note that I do not need to generate timestamps; these time stamps are pre-generated by the instrument itself using a high resolution real-time operating system. Parsing out these values is not an issue — they are stored using a standard format in UTC time. Originally I wanted to use the C# DateTime structure can only store time stamps up millisecond resolution.

Is there another object supplied with .NET or a common C# library that supports micro- and (ideally) nanosecond resolution timestamps, or am I going to have to roll my own?

share|improve this question
5  
The System.DateTime has resolution to 100 nanoseconds (as explained in the link that you provide). This is 1/10th of a microsecond, so would seem to already meet your requirements, no? – Mike Rosenblum Mar 18 '11 at 23:44
    
I worked on instrumentation code years ago. I found it necessary to use the instrument's own timesignals for really high-resolution stuff. If the time of a measurement really needs to be accurate to less than a microsecond, you probably need to have an instrument that presents the time of the measurement -- the time the sample was taken -- along with the measurement itself. If you don't do this, you're going to get all kinds of nasty jitter from context switching, cache misses, and other non-hard-real-time OS rubbish. – Ollie Jones Mar 19 '11 at 0:20
1  
@Ollie Jones: Yep, that's exactly what's happening. The timestamp is being generated by the instrument itself, and the instrument has very high precision timing hardware. I just need to find out what data structure to put it in once I have that timestamp handy! – Robert P Mar 19 '11 at 0:25
up vote 7 down vote accepted

You might be able to use DateTime after all. DateTime.Ticks' resolution is 100 nanoseconds. You can set the ticks with DateTime.AddTicks.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, except AddTicks takes a long (scroll down my answer) and a single tick is only .1 microseconds, so if he needs tighter granularity than that it won't work. – jcolebrand Mar 18 '11 at 23:58
2  
Yes, but he explicitly says that he needs microseconds, and ideally nanoseconds. That's why I phrased it with "might". – steinar Mar 19 '11 at 1:14
    
~ Yes, I was cognizant of that ;) ~ I just wanted to make sure somebody spelled those out. – jcolebrand Mar 19 '11 at 1:24
    
I tried DateTime.Ticks today and only got a resolution of about 16 milliseconds. – Peter Mortensen Mar 22 '13 at 22:10
3  
@PeterMortensen - what have you tried? My guess is you've tried Sleep(1) which will only give you a resolution of about 16 milli. However, the Ticks have a resolution of 10,000,000 per second. – Joezer Feb 15 '15 at 12:51

Looking at the answers, and the DateTime.Ticks property, it's possible to calculate Microseconds and Nanoseconds from the given values. As a result, I put together this extension method class to do it. (Sadly, I don't think I'll be able to use it given some other requirements, but other people may find it useful.)

/// <summary>
/// Extension methods for accessing Microseconds and Nanoseconds of a
/// DateTime object.
/// </summary>
public static class DateTimeExtensionMethods
{
   /// <summary>
   /// The number of ticks per microsecond.
   /// </summary>
   public const int TicksPerMicrosecond = 10;
   /// <summary>
   /// The number of ticks per Nanosecond.
   /// </summary>
   public const int NanosecondsPerTick = 100;

   /// <summary>
   /// Gets the microsecond fraction of a DateTime.
   /// </summary>
   /// <param name="self"></param>
   /// <returns></returns>
   public static int Microseconds(this DateTime self)
   {
      return (int)Math.Floor(
         (self.Ticks 
         % TimeSpan.TicksPerMillisecond )
         / (double)TicksPerMicrosecond);
   }
   /// <summary>
   /// Gets the Nanosecond fraction of a DateTime.  Note that the DateTime
   /// object can only store nanoseconds at resolution of 100 nanoseconds.
   /// </summary>
   /// <param name="self">The DateTime object.</param>
   /// <returns>the number of Nanoseconds.</returns>
   public static int Nanoseconds(this DateTime self)
   {
      return (int)(self.Ticks % TimeSpan.TicksPerMillisecond % TicksPerMicrosecond)
         * NanosecondsPerTick;
   }
   /// <summary>
   /// Adds a number of microseconds to this DateTime object.
   /// </summary>
   /// <param name="self">The DateTime object.</param>
   /// <param name="microseconds">The number of milliseconds to add.</param>
   public static DateTime AddMicroseconds(this DateTime self, int microseconds)
   {
      return self.AddTicks(microseconds * TicksPerMicrosecond);
   }
   /// <summary>
   /// Adds a number of nanoseconds to this DateTime object.  Note: this
   /// object only stores nanoseconds of resolutions of 100 seconds.
   /// Any nanoseconds passed in lower than that will be rounded using
   /// the default rounding algorithm in Math.Round().
   /// </summary>
   /// <param name="self">The DateTime object.</param>
   /// <param name="nanoseconds">The number of nanoseconds to add.</param>
   public static DateTime AddNanoseconds(this DateTime self, int nanoseconds)
   {
      return self.AddTicks((int)Math.Round(nanoseconds / (double)NanosecondsPerTick));
   }
}

This still won't let you set the Microseconds or Nanoseconds upon creation, but they can be added shortly after. It also doesn't give resolution better than what a DateTime can (eg, 1/10 of a microsecond aka 100 nanosecond resolution.)

DateTime time = new DateTime(year, month, day, hour, min, sec, msec);
time = time.AddMicroseconds(microseconds);
time = time.AddNanoseconds(nanoseconds); # note: rounds if not enough added

Here's hoping this works for someone else!

share|improve this answer
    
There is also the possibility to do something like time += TimeSpan.FromTicks(ticksFromMicroseconds(microseconds)), but that would be a matter of preference since essentially they do the same thing I guess... – heltonbiker Mar 6 '15 at 20:58

If you want something that operates on significant fractions of a microsecond, then No. The thing you're asking for doesn't exist as part of the standard libraries, but for what you're asking, why do you need this? It sounds like you really need two components, a string (variable length, hold's almost any conceivable value) and a DateTime for the UTC standard formatted date/time that you get natively.

Micro/nano scale second timekeeping is not in the "normal" range of computations, so it's not provided in the "normal" .NET libraries.

What will you be doing with these timestamps? Will you be comparing them? Adding/subtracting them? I would suggest running reflector for the basic DateTime object (actually I think I'm gonna do that real quick too)

For your benefit, here's the simple version of the .NET Reflector disassembly of the standard DateTime object (and since the other answer at the time of this edit suggests the TimeSpan element, that as well)

[Serializable]
public struct DateTime : IComparable, IFormattable, IConvertible, ISerializable, IComparable<DateTime>, IEquatable<DateTime>
{
    // Fields
    private ulong dateData;
    private const string DateDataField = "dateData";
    private const int DatePartDay = 3;
    private const int DatePartDayOfYear = 1;
    private const int DatePartMonth = 2;
    private const int DatePartYear = 0;
    private const int DaysPer100Years = 0x8eac;
    private const int DaysPer400Years = 0x23ab1;
    private const int DaysPer4Years = 0x5b5;
    private const int DaysPerYear = 0x16d;
    private const int DaysTo10000 = 0x37b9db;
    private const int DaysTo1601 = 0x8eac4;
    private const int DaysTo1899 = 0xa9559;
    private static readonly int[] DaysToMonth365;
    private static readonly int[] DaysToMonth366;
    private const long DoubleDateOffset = 0x85103c0cb83c000L;
    private const long FileTimeOffset = 0x701ce1722770000L;
    private const ulong FlagsMask = 13835058055282163712L;
    private const ulong KindLocal = 9223372036854775808L;
    private const ulong KindLocalAmbiguousDst = 13835058055282163712L;
    private const int KindShift = 0x3e;
    private const ulong KindUnspecified = 0L;
    private const ulong KindUtc = 0x4000000000000000L;
    private const ulong LocalMask = 9223372036854775808L;
    private const long MaxMillis = 0x11efae44cb400L;
    internal const long MaxTicks = 0x2bca2875f4373fffL;
    public static readonly DateTime MaxValue;
    private const int MillisPerDay = 0x5265c00;
    private const int MillisPerHour = 0x36ee80;
    private const int MillisPerMinute = 0xea60;
    private const int MillisPerSecond = 0x3e8;
    internal const long MinTicks = 0L;
    public static readonly DateTime MinValue;
    private const double OADateMaxAsDouble = 2958466.0;
    private const double OADateMinAsDouble = -657435.0;
    private const long OADateMinAsTicks = 0x6efdddaec64000L;
    private const long TicksCeiling = 0x4000000000000000L;
    private const string TicksField = "ticks";
    private const ulong TicksMask = 0x3fffffffffffffffL;
    private const long TicksPerDay = 0xc92a69c000L;
    private const long TicksPerHour = 0x861c46800L;
    private const long TicksPerMillisecond = 0x2710L;
    private const long TicksPerMinute = 0x23c34600L;
    private const long TicksPerSecond = 0x989680L;

    // Methods
    static DateTime();
    public DateTime(long ticks);
    private DateTime(ulong dateData);
    public DateTime(long ticks, DateTimeKind kind);
    private DateTime(SerializationInfo info, StreamingContext context);
    public DateTime(int year, int month, int day);
    internal DateTime(long ticks, DateTimeKind kind, bool isAmbiguousDst);
    public DateTime(int year, int month, int day, Calendar calendar);
    public DateTime(int year, int month, int day, int hour, int minute, int second);
    public DateTime(int year, int month, int day, int hour, int minute, int second, DateTimeKind kind);
    public DateTime(int year, int month, int day, int hour, int minute, int second, Calendar calendar);
    public DateTime(int year, int month, int day, int hour, int minute, int second, int millisecond);
    public DateTime(int year, int month, int day, int hour, int minute, int second, int millisecond, DateTimeKind kind);
    public DateTime(int year, int month, int day, int hour, int minute, int second, int millisecond, Calendar calendar);
    public DateTime(int year, int month, int day, int hour, int minute, int second, int millisecond, Calendar calendar, DateTimeKind kind);
    public DateTime Add(TimeSpan value);
    private DateTime Add(double value, int scale);
    public DateTime AddDays(double value);
    public DateTime AddHours(double value);
    public DateTime AddMilliseconds(double value);
    public DateTime AddMinutes(double value);
    public DateTime AddMonths(int months);
    public DateTime AddSeconds(double value);
    public DateTime AddTicks(long value);
    public DateTime AddYears(int value);
    public static int Compare(DateTime t1, DateTime t2);
    public int CompareTo(DateTime value);
    public int CompareTo(object value);
    private static long DateToTicks(int year, int month, int day);
    public static int DaysInMonth(int year, int month);
    internal static long DoubleDateToTicks(double value);
    public bool Equals(DateTime value);
    public override bool Equals(object value);
    public static bool Equals(DateTime t1, DateTime t2);
    public static DateTime FromBinary(long dateData);
    internal static DateTime FromBinaryRaw(long dateData);
    public static DateTime FromFileTime(long fileTime);
    public static DateTime FromFileTimeUtc(long fileTime);
    public static DateTime FromOADate(double d);
    private int GetDatePart(int part);
    public string[] GetDateTimeFormats();
    public string[] GetDateTimeFormats(char format);
    public string[] GetDateTimeFormats(IFormatProvider provider);
    public string[] GetDateTimeFormats(char format, IFormatProvider provider);
    public override int GetHashCode();
    [MethodImpl(MethodImplOptions.InternalCall)]
    internal static extern long GetSystemTimeAsFileTime();
    public TypeCode GetTypeCode();
    internal bool IsAmbiguousDaylightSavingTime();
    public bool IsDaylightSavingTime();
    public static bool IsLeapYear(int year);
    public static DateTime operator +(DateTime d, TimeSpan t);
    public static bool operator ==(DateTime d1, DateTime d2);
    public static bool operator >(DateTime t1, DateTime t2);
    public static bool operator >=(DateTime t1, DateTime t2);
    public static bool operator !=(DateTime d1, DateTime d2);
    public static bool operator <(DateTime t1, DateTime t2);
    public static bool operator <=(DateTime t1, DateTime t2);
    public static TimeSpan operator -(DateTime d1, DateTime d2);
    public static DateTime operator -(DateTime d, TimeSpan t);
    public static DateTime Parse(string s);
    public static DateTime Parse(string s, IFormatProvider provider);
    public static DateTime Parse(string s, IFormatProvider provider, DateTimeStyles styles);
    public static DateTime ParseExact(string s, string format, IFormatProvider provider);
    public static DateTime ParseExact(string s, string format, IFormatProvider provider, DateTimeStyles style);
    public static DateTime ParseExact(string s, string[] formats, IFormatProvider provider, DateTimeStyles style);
    public static DateTime SpecifyKind(DateTime value, DateTimeKind kind);
    public TimeSpan Subtract(DateTime value);
    public DateTime Subtract(TimeSpan value);
    bool IConvertible.ToBoolean(IFormatProvider provider);
    byte IConvertible.ToByte(IFormatProvider provider);
    char IConvertible.ToChar(IFormatProvider provider);
    DateTime IConvertible.ToDateTime(IFormatProvider provider);
    decimal IConvertible.ToDecimal(IFormatProvider provider);
    double IConvertible.ToDouble(IFormatProvider provider);
    short IConvertible.ToInt16(IFormatProvider provider);
    int IConvertible.ToInt32(IFormatProvider provider);
    long IConvertible.ToInt64(IFormatProvider provider);
    sbyte IConvertible.ToSByte(IFormatProvider provider);
    float IConvertible.ToSingle(IFormatProvider provider);
    object IConvertible.ToType(Type type, IFormatProvider provider);
    ushort IConvertible.ToUInt16(IFormatProvider provider);
    uint IConvertible.ToUInt32(IFormatProvider provider);
    ulong IConvertible.ToUInt64(IFormatProvider provider);
    [SecurityPermission(SecurityAction.LinkDemand, Flags=SecurityPermissionFlag.SerializationFormatter)]
    void ISerializable.GetObjectData(SerializationInfo info, StreamingContext context);
    private static double TicksToOADate(long value);
    private static long TimeToTicks(int hour, int minute, int second);
    public long ToBinary();
    internal long ToBinaryRaw();
    public long ToFileTime();
    public long ToFileTimeUtc();
    public DateTime ToLocalTime();
    public string ToLongDateString();
    public string ToLongTimeString();
    public double ToOADate();
    public string ToShortDateString();
    public string ToShortTimeString();
    public override string ToString();
    public string ToString(IFormatProvider provider);
    public string ToString(string format);
    public string ToString(string format, IFormatProvider provider);
    public DateTime ToUniversalTime();
    internal static bool TryCreate(int year, int month, int day, int hour, int minute, int second, int millisecond, out DateTime result);
    public static bool TryParse(string s, out DateTime result);
    public static bool TryParse(string s, IFormatProvider provider, DateTimeStyles styles, out DateTime result);
    public static bool TryParseExact(string s, string[] formats, IFormatProvider provider, DateTimeStyles style, out DateTime result);
    public static bool TryParseExact(string s, string format, IFormatProvider provider, DateTimeStyles style, out DateTime result);

    // Properties
    public DateTime Date { get; }
    public int Day { get; }
    public DayOfWeek DayOfWeek { get; }
    public int DayOfYear { get; }
    public int Hour { get; }
    private ulong InternalKind { get; }
    private long InternalTicks { get; }
    public DateTimeKind Kind { get; }
    public int Millisecond { get; }
    public int Minute { get; }
    public int Month { get; }
    public static DateTime Now { get; }
    public int Second { get; }
    public long Ticks { get; }
    public TimeSpan TimeOfDay { get; }
    public static DateTime Today { get; }
    public static DateTime UtcNow { get; }
    public int Year { get; }
}

[Serializable, StructLayout(LayoutKind.Sequential), ComVisible(true)]
public struct TimeSpan : IComparable, IComparable<TimeSpan>, IEquatable<TimeSpan>
{
    public const long TicksPerMillisecond = 0x2710L;
    private const double MillisecondsPerTick = 0.0001;
    public const long TicksPerSecond = 0x989680L;
    private const double SecondsPerTick = 1E-07;
    public const long TicksPerMinute = 0x23c34600L;
    private const double MinutesPerTick = 1.6666666666666667E-09;
    public const long TicksPerHour = 0x861c46800L;
    private const double HoursPerTick = 2.7777777777777777E-11;
    public const long TicksPerDay = 0xc92a69c000L;
    private const double DaysPerTick = 1.1574074074074074E-12;
    private const int MillisPerSecond = 0x3e8;
    private const int MillisPerMinute = 0xea60;
    private const int MillisPerHour = 0x36ee80;
    private const int MillisPerDay = 0x5265c00;
    private const long MaxSeconds = 0xd6bf94d5e5L;
    private const long MinSeconds = -922337203685L;
    private const long MaxMilliSeconds = 0x346dc5d638865L;
    private const long MinMilliSeconds = -922337203685477L;
    public static readonly TimeSpan Zero;
    public static readonly TimeSpan MaxValue;
    public static readonly TimeSpan MinValue;
    internal long _ticks;
    public TimeSpan(long ticks);
    public TimeSpan(int hours, int minutes, int seconds);
    public TimeSpan(int days, int hours, int minutes, int seconds);
    public TimeSpan(int days, int hours, int minutes, int seconds, int milliseconds);
    public long Ticks { get; }
    public int Days { get; }
    public int Hours { get; }
    public int Milliseconds { get; }
    public int Minutes { get; }
    public int Seconds { get; }
    public double TotalDays { get; }
    public double TotalHours { get; }
    public double TotalMilliseconds { get; }
    public double TotalMinutes { get; }
    public double TotalSeconds { get; }
    public TimeSpan Add(TimeSpan ts);
    public static int Compare(TimeSpan t1, TimeSpan t2);
    public int CompareTo(object value);
    public int CompareTo(TimeSpan value);
    public static TimeSpan FromDays(double value);
    public TimeSpan Duration();
    public override bool Equals(object value);
    public bool Equals(TimeSpan obj);
    public static bool Equals(TimeSpan t1, TimeSpan t2);
    public override int GetHashCode();
    public static TimeSpan FromHours(double value);
    private static TimeSpan Interval(double value, int scale);
    public static TimeSpan FromMilliseconds(double value);
    public static TimeSpan FromMinutes(double value);
    public TimeSpan Negate();
    public static TimeSpan Parse(string s);
    public static bool TryParse(string s, out TimeSpan result);
    public static TimeSpan FromSeconds(double value);
    public TimeSpan Subtract(TimeSpan ts);
    public static TimeSpan FromTicks(long value);
    internal static long TimeToTicks(int hour, int minute, int second);
    private string IntToString(int n, int digits);
    public override string ToString();
    public static TimeSpan operator -(TimeSpan t);
    public static TimeSpan operator -(TimeSpan t1, TimeSpan t2);
    public static TimeSpan operator +(TimeSpan t);
    public static TimeSpan operator +(TimeSpan t1, TimeSpan t2);
    public static bool operator ==(TimeSpan t1, TimeSpan t2);
    public static bool operator !=(TimeSpan t1, TimeSpan t2);
    public static bool operator <(TimeSpan t1, TimeSpan t2);
    public static bool operator <=(TimeSpan t1, TimeSpan t2);
    public static bool operator >(TimeSpan t1, TimeSpan t2);
    public static bool operator >=(TimeSpan t1, TimeSpan t2);
    static TimeSpan();
    // Nested Types
    [StructLayout(LayoutKind.Sequential)]
    private struct StringParser
    {
        private string str;
        private char ch;
        private int pos;
        private int len;
        private ParseError error;
        internal void NextChar();
        internal char NextNonDigit();
        internal long Parse(string s);
        internal bool TryParse(string s, out long value);
        internal bool ParseInt(int max, out int i);
        internal bool ParseTime(out long time);
        internal void SkipBlanks();
        // Nested Types
        private enum ParseError
        {
            ArgumentNull = 4,
            Format = 1,
            Overflow = 2,
            OverflowHoursMinutesSeconds = 3
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
These timestamps will be used for multiple purposes; some, just to know when it happened (an "application" level usage), but the more important reason is to know the timing of events that occured on the box: a 'time difference." These events can be very, very short lived, so the accuracy must be very high - hence 'micro' and 'nano' second resolution. – Robert P Mar 18 '11 at 23:52
    
@RobertP then I would look at storing the value as a string and just doing string comparisons to determine "this before that". That will work just as well, and will be a little easier to read overall, and removes a level of transparency. idk, just my two cents. I'm, actually surprised if you tell me the hardware vendor doesn't already have something for you out of the box to work with the device for interpreting the data, unless they only intend you to use strings anyways – jcolebrand Mar 18 '11 at 23:55
    
@drachenstern: Would it help you if I said my company made the device, and I'm implementing that very library? :) The string option would be useful if relative times were all that were needed, but we need to know and have access to the exact numbers. – Robert P Mar 19 '11 at 0:02
    
@RobertP ~ Indeed that would change things just a tad ;) – jcolebrand Mar 19 '11 at 0:42
    
@RobertP I think this sounds like a very interesting thing to work on, and I would suggest reimplementing DateTime in a manner of speaking. I am not totally unfamiliar with the sort of thing you're working on, but I've never written anything quite like this myself. The biggest thing is just thinking about how best to store the data, and that depends on how you're getting it back. I would say extend DateTime to have a long for "subticks" if the data gets that detailed. Quite frankly, anything faster than megahertz boggles my mind, so I would have to have the maths of everything in front of me. – jcolebrand Mar 19 '11 at 0:46

If I really needed more accuracy than the 100 ns resolution provided by DateTime, I would consider creating a structure that contains a DateTime and an integer value:

public struct HiResDateTime
{
    public HiResDateTime(DateTime dateTime, int nanoseconds)
    {
        if (nanoSeconds < 0 || nanoSeconds > 99) 
            throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException(...);
        DateTime = dateTime;
        Nanoseconds = nanoseconds;
    }

    ... possibly other constructors including one that takes a timestamp parameter
    ... in the format provided by the instruments.

    public DateTime DateTime { get; private set; }
    public int Nanoseconds { get; private set; }

    ... implementation ...
}

Then implement whatever is needed, for example:

  • Comparison (DateTime first, then Nanoseconds)
  • ToString() e.g. format DateTime to 100 ns accuracy then append nanoseconds.
  • Conversion to/from DateTime
  • Add/subtract (might need a similar HiResTimeSpan) ... etc. ...
share|improve this answer

I am struggling with this same issue, in that I have a project where I have picosecond resolution timestamps. My source data is in "time_t" format, i.e. second since epoch + picoseconds + UTC Offset.

The best solution I have found is to work with "decimal seconds since epoch in UTC" as my time format internally, and only use DateTime as a pretty print object, to extract locale/formatting up to 1 s resolution, and then manually manipulate the string to include fractional seconds.

share|improve this answer

You could probably roll your own in various ways.

1.) Create a structure using System.Decimal field as the "backing store".

2.) Create a structure using System.Numerics.BigInteger as backing.

Wrap methods to use System.DateTime for convenient "Parts" (year, month, day,...) Include your own Nanonsecond, Picosecond, Femtosecond, etc., properties and methods.

FYI:

DateTime.MaxValue.Ticks : 3,155,378,975,999,999,999

Decimal.MaxValue : 79,228,162,514,264,337,593,543,950,335

BigInteger : Arbitrarily Large!

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