Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I’ve been trying to wrap my head around how to expose my domain objects to the client. Whether I’m using a rich client or I’m using the web, I want to use the MVP and repository patterns.

What I’m trying to wrap my head around is how I expose my repository and model, which will be on the server. Is it even possible to expose complex business objects that have state via a web service, or will I have to use a proprietary technology that is not language/platform agnostic, like .Net remoting, EJB, COM+, DCOM, etc?

Some other constraints are that I don’t want to have to keep loading the complex domain object from the database or passing it all over the wire every time I want to do an operation. Some complex logic might be that certain areas of the screen might be disabled or invisible based on the users permissions in combination with the state of the object. Validation and error message information will also need to be displayed to the user. I want to be able to logically call a lot of my domain object operations as if it were running on the same machine.

With the web, you have free rein. You don’t have to expose your objects across service boundaries, so you can make them a rich as you would like. I’m trying to create an N-teir architecture that is rich and works when the client calling the model is on a different machine.

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can expose your domain objects like any other object through REST or web services. I think key is to understand that you will have to expose services that provide business value in a single call, and these do not necessarily map 1:1 to your repositories. So while you on the server may expect a single service call to use multiple repositories and perform various aggregations, the things you expose over any kind of web-service should be more or less complete results. The operations you expose on the service should not expose individual repositories but rather focus on meaningful operations that provide a given business value.

I hope this helps somewhat.

share|improve this answer
    
Yeah, that's what I figured. –  Charles Graham Feb 11 '09 at 9:42

You can use a SOAP formater for .Net remoting, but the resulting service will probably be hard to consume as a service, and it will surly be very chatty.

If you want your domain model to be consumed as a service,it should be designed as a service.

As stated in domain driven design, a service is stateless, so it won't expose your objects directly. Your service should expose methods that provides meaningful business operations that will be executed as a single unit.

Usually consider that the model in your client is in a different bounded context because its concerns will be a bit different from the one on the server.

share|improve this answer
    
Yeah, maybe I need to finish at book. It's just that things are so easy when you are on the Web. It's hard to think about them when you don't have that conveniance. –  Charles Graham Feb 11 '09 at 9:41
1  
Specifically, if your server can manage several users simultaneously and your client allows only one one user at time, you've a concern shift here. –  Think Before Coding Feb 11 '09 at 10:28

What I’m trying to wrap my head around is how I expose my repository and model, which will be on the server. Is it even possible to expose complex business objects that have state via a web service, or will I have to use a proprietary technology that is not language/platform agnostic, like .Net remoting, EJB, COM+, DCOM, etc?

A good domain model is going to be highly behavioral and designed around the problem domain (and your discussions with domain experts), I'd thus argue against designing it to be exposed to remote consumers (in the same way that designing it from the database or GUI first is a bad idea).

Instead I'd look at using a style like REST or messaging and decide on the interface you want to expose and then map to/from the domain. So if you went with REST you'd design your resources and API (URL's, representations, etc.) and then you'd need to fulfill it from the domain model.

If this becomes un-natural then you can always have multiple models, for example mapping a seperate read-only presentation specific model to the same data-source (or which wraps the complex behavioral domain model) is an approach I've used several times.

Some other constraints are that I don’t want to have to keep loading the complex domain object from the database or passing it all over the wire every time I want to do an operation

Look at caching in HTTP and supporting multiple representations for a resource, also look at caching within your data-access solution.

Validation and error message information will also need to be displayed to the user. I want to be able to logically call a lot of my domain object operations as if it were running on the same machine.

You can either represent this as a resource or more likely look at HTTP status codes and the response bodies you'd want to use in those situations.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.