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I'm rather noob on bash (or perl). Looking a way to modify some lines in a file, (basically removing the first 2 characters of each line, and add a "," at the end of each line)

###element
##.element
###test-element-00

becomes the following,

#element,
.element,
#test-element-00,

Thanks

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up vote 2 down vote accepted

On bash the command you are looking for is sed, try:

cat filename | sed 's/^..\(.*\)$/\1,/'
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1  
+1 for reminding me how grouping works in sed (which of standard regex syntax are we using today?), -0.5 for a useless use of cat(1), +0.5 because corgis are great dogs. – mu is too short Mar 19 '11 at 5:03
1  
-1 for useless cat. – kurumi Mar 19 '11 at 5:07
perl -ple's/..(.*)/$1,/' infile > outfile

perl -ple's/..//;s/$/,/' infile > outfile

Using in-place editing:

perl -i -ple's/..(.*)/$1,/' file

perl -i -ple's/..//;s/$/,/' file
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A bit of simple sed(1) is all you need for that:

sed 's/^..//' < your_file | sed 's/$/,/'

Or you can use Perl if you really want to:

perl -pe 's/^..(.*)/$1,/' < your_file

Or you can even do it with cut(1), xargs(1), and printf(1):

cut -c2- < your_file | xargs printf '%s,\n'

We could probably be here all night coming with clever combinations of shell tools to perform the desired transformation, I'd probably just go with the perl one and move on to more productive things.

The sed approach can probably be done better but my sed is rusty.

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Try something like this:

my @old_lines = qw(###element ##.element ###test-element-00);
my @new_lines;
for my $line (@old_lines) {
   $line =~ s/^##//;
   $line .= ',';
   push @new_lines, $line;
}

print "@new_lines";
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awk

$> awk '/^#/ { print substr($0,3)"," }' file
#element,
.element,
#test-element-00,

Ruby(1.9+)

$> ruby -ne 'print "#{$_.chomp[2..-1]},\n" if /^#/' file
#element,
.element,
#test-element-00,

Or just pure bash

$> while read -r line; do echo "${line:2},"; done < file
#element,
.element,
#test-element-00,

or sed if you prefer

$> sed 's/^..//;s/$/,/' file
#element,
.element,
#test-element-00,
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There are several ways of doing this, one way of doing this in perl would be :

$line =  '##element'
$line = substr ( $line, 2 ) . ',';
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OK, just for variety:

yes , | head -n $(wc -l < filename) | paste -d '' <(cut -c3- filename) -

or

yes , | head -n $(wc -l < filename) | paste -d '' <(grep -Po '..\K.*' filename) -

Requires a shell, such as Bash, that supports process substitution. For the grep version, support for Perl Compatible Regular Expressions is required.

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Here's yet another to way to do it using the ed command:

str='
###element
##.element
###test-element-00
'

# for in-place file editing use "ed -s file" and replace ",p" with "w"
# cf. http://wiki.bash-hackers.org/howto/edit-ed
cat <<-'EOF' | sed -e 's/^ *//' -e 's/ *$//' | ed -s <(echo "$str")
   H
   ,g/.\{2\}/s/^..\(.*\)$/\1,/
   ,p
   q
EOF
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Bash can handle this just fine: line="##element"; echo "${line#??},"

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