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I used "cin" to read words from input stream, which like

int main( ){
     string word;
     while (cin >> word){
         //do sth on the input word
     }

    // perform some other operations
}

the code structure is sth like the above one. It is compilable. During the execution, I keep inputting something like aa bb cc dd

My question is how to end this input? In other words, suppose the textfile is just "aa bb cc dd". But I do not know how to let the program know that the file ends. Thanks for helping.

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up vote 13 down vote accepted

Your code is correct. If you were interactively inputting, you would need to send a EOF character, such as CTRL-D.

This EOF character isn't needed when you are reading in a file. This is because once you hit the end of your input stream, there is nothing left to "cin"(because the stream is now closed), thus the while loop exits.

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10  
It is worth noting that the manner one signals an EOF from the keyboard varies by operating system. MS Windows requires one to type CTRL-Z while Unix and related operating systems require CTRL-D. – Robᵩ Mar 19 '11 at 16:43
int main() {
     string word;
     while (cin >> word) {
         // do something on the input word.
         if (foo)
           break;
     }
    // perform some other operations.
}
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cin >> some_variable_or_manipulator will always evaluate to a reference to cin. If you want to check and see if there is more input still to read, you need to do something like this:

int main( ){
     string word;
     while (cin.good()){
         cin >> word;
         //do sth on the input word
     }

    // perform some other operations
}

This checks the stream's goodbit, which is set to true when none of eofbit, failbit, or badbit are set. If there is an error reading, or the stream received an EOF character (from reaching the end of a file or from the user at the keyboard pressing CTRL+D), cin.good() will return false, and break you out of the loop.

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Hit Ctrl-Z (Ctrl-D on *nix systems) and hit enter. That sends an EOF and invalidates the stream.

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That also stops the process. no? – Nawaz Mar 19 '11 at 4:44
    
That ends the while loop. I'm not sure what you mean by process. I'm confused, are you taking in input from a file or from standard in? Or are you redirecting the input with < ? – jonsca Mar 19 '11 at 4:47
1  
@Nawaz: No it doesn't stop the process. You may be confusing it with Ctrl-C. – dappawit Mar 19 '11 at 4:47
    
+1 dappawit, I didn't even think of that. – jonsca Mar 19 '11 at 4:51

As others already answer this question, I would like add this important point:

Since Ctrl-Z on Windows (and Ctrl-D on unix systems) causes EOF to reach, and you exit from the while loop, but outside the while loop you cannot read further input, since the EOF is already reached.

So to enable reading using cin again, you need to clear eof flag, and all other failure flags, as shown below:

cin.clear();

After doing this, you can start reading input using cin once again!

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I guess you want to jump out at the end of file. You can get the value of basic_ios::eof , it returns true at the end of stream.

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Take the input from a file. Then you will find that the while loop terminates when your program stops taking input. Actually cin stops taking input when it finds an EOF marker. Each input file ends with this EOF marker. When this EOF marker is encountered by operator>> it modifies the value of internal flag eofbit into false and consequently the while loop stops.

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It helps me to terminate loop by hitting ENTER.

int main() {
    string word;
    while(getline(cin,word) && s.compare("\0") != 0) {
        //do sth on the input word
    }

    // perform some other operations
}
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