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How can you add two fraction in c# like this:

11/6 + 3/4 = 31/12

and then how would you simplify the answer?

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4  
Post your current progress. –  Matheus Moreira Mar 19 '11 at 5:01
8  

4 Answers 4

As boredom strikes on a Friday night... resulting in a Fraction class with overloaded operators. Sobriety of design cannot be guaranteed.

It works like this...

Fraction left = "1/2";
Fraction right = "3/8";

Fraction result1 = ((left + right) * left / right).Simplify();
Console.WriteLine(result1);

Fraction test2 = "12/32";
test2 = test2.Simplify();
Console.WriteLine(test2);

Implementation something like below...

public struct Fraction
{
    public int Numerator { get; set; }
    public int Denominator { get; set; }

    public Fraction(int numerator, int denominator)
        : this()
    {
        Numerator = numerator;
        Denominator = denominator;
    }

    public Fraction Simplify()
    {
        int gcd = GCD();
        return new Fraction(Numerator / gcd, Denominator / gcd);
    }

    public Fraction InTermsOf(Fraction other)
    {
        return Denominator == other.Denominator ? this :
            new Fraction(Numerator * other.Denominator, Denominator * other.Denominator);
    }

    public int GCD()
    {
        int a = Numerator;
        int b = Denominator;
        while (b != 0)
        {
            int t = b;
            b = a % b;
            a = t;
        }
        return a;
    }

    public Fraction Reciprocal()
    {
        return new Fraction(Denominator, Numerator);
    }


    public static Fraction operator +(Fraction left, Fraction right)
    {
        var left2 = left.InTermsOf(right);
        var right2 = right.InTermsOf(left);

        return new Fraction(left2.Numerator + right2.Numerator, left2.Denominator);
    }

    public static Fraction operator -(Fraction left, Fraction right)
    {
        var left2 = left.InTermsOf(right);
        var right2 = right.InTermsOf(left);

        return new Fraction(left2.Numerator - right2.Numerator, left2.Denominator);
    }

    public static Fraction operator *(Fraction left, Fraction right)
    {
        return new Fraction(left.Numerator * right.Numerator, left.Denominator * right.Denominator);
    }

    public static Fraction operator /(Fraction left, Fraction right)
    {
        return new Fraction(left.Numerator * right.Denominator, left.Denominator * right.Numerator);
    }

    public static implicit operator Fraction(string value)
    {
        var tokens = value.Split('/');
        int num;
        int den;
        if (tokens.Length == 1 && int.TryParse(tokens[0], out num))
        {
            return new Fraction(num, 1);
        }
        else if (tokens.Length == 2 && int.TryParse(tokens[0], out num) && int.TryParse(tokens[1], out den))
        {
            return new Fraction(num, den);
        }
        throw new Exception("Invalid fraction format");
    }

    public override string ToString()
    {
        return string.Format("{0}/{1}", Numerator, Denominator);
    }
}
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how if fraction + whole..?? –  hi tech id Mar 19 '11 at 6:27
    
I modified the implicit operator to support creating a fraction from a whole number. Fraction whole = "5" will work. Alternatively, you can do something nifty like Fraction test = left + "5"; –  Jon Mar 19 '11 at 6:46

Find the LCD first then do the following

  num1 *= lcd / denum1;
  num2 *= lcd / denum2;
  sumNum = num1 + num2;
share|improve this answer
1  
what is the ldc..?? –  hi tech id Mar 19 '11 at 5:21
1  
Idc where i used it –  Dotnet Mar 19 '11 at 5:24
1  
@hi tech: I think he meant "Least Common Multiple", and yes, lcd is a poor acronym for that. –  Ben Voigt Mar 19 '11 at 5:27
8  
I'm quite sure he meant 'least common denominator' and LCD is quite an accurate acronym for that. –  Kasper Holdum Mar 19 '11 at 5:30

.Net doesn't have built-in support (that I know of) for Rational Numbers, but there is at least one existing library out there.

Your solution will ultimately come down to storing the numerator and denominator (probably in a custom class that you create), doing arithmetic against other numerator/denominator pairs (possibly by implementing overloaded operators on your class), and applying a fraction simplification algorithm.

Here are some resources:

Existing implementations

Methods for reducing fractions

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I have never used c# but I can give you an explanation of how to do it.

  1. check if bottom number are the same(equal)
  2. If not than create loop that will loop through all numbers and multiply them by bottom numbers. For example, let just say you started with 1 than you multiply 1 by 6 and then 1 by 4 if the result are same than you got right number.
  3. than you the number you got in #2 and multiply it by the top numbers
  4. than just add the top numbers
  5. keep the bottom number the same
  6. create a loop to see what number can be divided by both numbers(top and bottom)
share|improve this answer
    
Find LCM through a nested loop? There are many better ways of doing this. –  Ben Voigt Mar 19 '11 at 5:15
    
@Ben: Recursion! –  Mehrdad Mar 19 '11 at 5:24
    
@Mehrdad: I guess it's the "through all numbers" I'm really taking issue with. I could have worded that comment better. –  Ben Voigt Mar 19 '11 at 5:25
    
I mentioned that i never used C# so I never saw an LCM before. –  Ramilol Mar 19 '11 at 6:00

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