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I am working on a project in Mercurial, and all of a sudden, when I run "hg status", I see a bunch of files in my ".hg" directory, reported as "not tracked". It looks like this:

? .hg/00changelog.i
? .hg/00manifest.i
? .hg/branch
? .hg/branchheads.cache
? .hg/data/.hgignore.i
? .hg/data/.htaccess.i
? .hg/data/autostart.cgi.i
? .hg/data/common.py.i
? .hg/data/common.pyc.i
? .hg/data/cron.i
? .hg/data/index.html.i

The list is much longer. I can show you everything if you want. Why is this happening? I know that files in ".hg" are special to Mercurial but why is it suddenly telling me now? It is annoying to have my status listing cluttered with this stuff. How can I make it stop?

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The .hg directory contains the whole local repository, so it's very very strange that hg status tells you that your repository is untracked. :-) How have you created your repository? hg init, hg clone or anything else? –  javanna Mar 19 '11 at 11:55
    
I can't remember exactly what I did. Maybe I accidentally deleted some files in .hg, or maybe it was cosmic rays. From now on, I will pay close attention to what I am doing and if it happens again, I will post some more details here. –  Elias Zamaria Mar 19 '11 at 18:00
    
What version of Mercurial are you running? Does hg root give the answer you'd expect? –  Ry4an Mar 20 '11 at 2:41
1  
Try running hg verify to ensure the the repo isn't corrupt. –  nbevans Mar 20 '11 at 10:43
    
I created it with hg clone. I am using Mercurial 1.7.5. hg root gives me the directory of my repo, like I would expect. –  Elias Zamaria Mar 20 '11 at 17:08

1 Answer 1

Try cloning your repository and see if the problem persists in the new clone. If it doesn't you can copy over any uncommitted files to it and then adjust the default pull path in .hg/hgrc and forget about the broken clone. You may want to save the broken clone until you are sure everything you need is safely in the new clone.

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