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The given C code

#include <stdio.h>
int x = 14; 
size_t check()
{
   struct x {};
   return sizeof(x); // which x
}
int main()
{
    printf("%zu",check()); 
    return 0;
}

gives 4 as output in C on my 32 bit implementation whereas in C++ the code

#include <iostream>
int x = 14;    
size_t check()
{
   struct x {};
   return sizeof(x); // which x    
}
int main()
{
    std::cout<< check(); 
    return 0;
}

outputs 1. Why such difference?

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1  
2  
@phooji: No, that's not a duplicate. –  Saurabh Manchanda Mar 19 '11 at 8:46
    
@Saurabh: You may be right -- the questions don't cover exactly the same ground, but I think the answers are pertinent (see Prasoon's answer and also my comment to your answer). –  phooji Mar 19 '11 at 8:51
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4 Answers

up vote 24 down vote accepted

In C++ class declaration struct x {}; introduces the name x into the scope of check and hides x (previously declared as int at file scope). You get 1 as the output because size of empty class cannot be zero in C++.

In C, an inner scope declaration of a struct tag name never hides the name of an object or function in an outer scope.You need to use the tag name struct to refer to the typename x (struct). However you can't have an empty struct in C as it violates the syntactical constraints on struct(however gcc supports it as an extension).

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3  
+1, but perhaps one should emphasize the fact that in C++ struct x only hides the variable because x is declared in the outer scope. If they were declared in the same scope they would happily live together and the behavior of the sizeof would be the same as for C. –  Jens Gustedt Mar 19 '11 at 9:12
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The C code is giving you the size of the global variable 'x', whereas the C++ code is giving the size of the empty struct. To get the size of the struct x in the C code, use sizeof(struct x)

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You are right about the scoping issue, but it's not the whole story. In particular, now the question becomes: why does sizeof(struct x) yield 0 in the C version :) –  phooji Mar 19 '11 at 8:52
    
+1 for speed.!! –  Prasoon Saurav Mar 19 '11 at 8:53
    
@phooji : Empty struct in C is a constraint violation. –  Prasoon Saurav Mar 19 '11 at 8:53
    
@Prasoon: So I've heard. –  phooji Mar 19 '11 at 8:55
1  
@phooji: As C doesn't allow empty structs and hence, the construct in the above program being invalid, I don't think arguing over the same would be very beneficial. –  Saurabh Manchanda Mar 19 '11 at 8:59
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In C, struct tags live in a separate name space, and you have to use the struct keyword to access names in there. This is the reason that the "typedef struct {} x" idiom is so popular in C--it allows you to essentially promote struct names to the global namespace.

In C++, by contrast, structs (and all other names) live in the namespace surrounding the declaration, rather than a separate struct tag namespace as in C.

As Saurabh said, use sizeof(struct x) in C, or use the typedef struct {} x trick to get sizeof(x) to work as in C++.

As an added bonus, the C++ program outputs 1 because concrete class objects must have nonzero size (so that different objects must have different addresses), so the compiler has padded the struct with an anonymous char value.

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In C, I don't think you can refer to a type (i.e. struct x) directly using its name only. You have to create an object of that type and run sizeof over it.

In C++, sizeof when applied to a type name returns the size of any object of that type.

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