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>>> (()) == ()
True
>>> (())
()
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3 Answers 3

up vote 12 down vote accepted

() is a 0-tuple. (foo) results in the value of foo. Hence, (()) results in a 0-tuple.

From the tutorial:

; a tuple with one item is constructed by following a value with a comma (it is not sufficient to enclose a single value in parentheses).

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I appended my answer to yours, hope you don't mind. –  ripper234 Mar 19 '11 at 10:13
    
It is an empty tuple, to be correct. –  glglgl Aug 30 '13 at 20:43

For the same reason that (4) == 4: adding parentheses around an expression does not alter its meaning (unless it would otherwise have been grouped differently of course).

Note that ( foo ) is not a 1-tuple. Otherwise things like 3 * (4 + 5) would be an error as (4 + 5) would be a 1-tuple containing 9 and you can't add a number to a 1-tuple.

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I see now. From the tutorial.

; a tuple with one item is constructed by following a value with a comma (it is not sufficient to enclose a single value in parentheses).

So (()) is not the tuple that contains the empty tuple - this is that tuple: ((),)

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And under certain conditions the parens aren't even required. >>> 3, (3,) –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Mar 19 '11 at 10:20

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