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What I am trying to do is give each item in my listView to have a unique color. So what I have is number of items in my list view as 'count'

My approach is to call the method below and give the method number of my items, and then it should have an array which saves the first color, then when next color is going to be generated it should be compared with colors before it in the array.

The problem is I cant figure out a way for what kind of array I am going to need and how do I compare each inserted color in the array with last inserted colors. here is my code:

public Color GetUniqueRandomColor(int count){

for(int i = 0; i < count; i++)
{
Color.FromArgb(randomColor.Next(70, 200), randomColor.Next(100, 225), randomColor.Next(100, 230));
}

return Color.Red;}

this is how an element will look in the array:

Color [A=255, R=132, G=148, B=181]

As you can see my method still lacks the needed array and the algorithm to compare new inserted colors to it. Some help and tips will be appriciated!

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3  
As a sidenote... You are generating color that could be VERY similar. Try to distinguish between 132, 148, 181 and 132, 148, 180 if you are able! :-) Technically they ARE different. –  xanatos Mar 19 '11 at 12:25
    
What use is uniqueness if the user doesn't see the difference anyways? –  CodesInChaos Mar 19 '11 at 12:43
    
The accepted answer solves your question as you stated it, yes. But I don't think your use will be able to tell it apart from a naive algorithm that does not enforce uniqueness. –  CodesInChaos Mar 19 '11 at 12:57

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

With C# 3.5

public static Color[] GetUniqueRandomColor(int count)
{
    Color[] colors = new Color[count];
    HashSet<Color> hs = new HashSet<Color>();

    Random randomColor = new Random();

    for(int i = 0; i < count; i++)
    {
        Color color;
        while (!hs.Add(color = Color.FromArgb(randomColor.Next(70, 200), randomColor.Next(100, 225), randomColor.Next(100, 230))));
        colors[i] = color;
    }    

    return colors;
}

If you only have C# 2.0, you can substitute HashSet with a Dictionary, where the bool is only a placeholder that you won't use, but the while expression will get a little more complex

public static Color[] GetUniqueRandomColor(int count)
{
    Color[] colors = new Color[count];
    Dictionary<Color, bool> hs = new Dictionary<Color, bool>();

    Random randomColor = new Random();

    for (int i = 0; i < count; i++)
    {
        Color color;
        while (hs.ContainsKey(color = Color.FromArgb(randomColor.Next(70, 200), randomColor.Next(100, 225), randomColor.Next(100, 230)))) ;
        hs.Add(color, true);
        colors[i] = color;
    }

    return colors;
}
share|improve this answer
2  
A bodyless while. Ugly. IMO you should separate the assignment to color and the while condition. And if you use a while without body at least add {} in new lines to make that obvious. –  CodesInChaos Mar 19 '11 at 12:45
1  
This algorithm becomes slower as you approach 2 112 500 items and will finally hang in an endless loop once the uniqueness condition can't be satisfied anymore. –  CodesInChaos Mar 19 '11 at 12:48
    
+1 to both of them... And I knew it... But when you have to fight against the text editor of SO, {} in a new line are a pain :-) And for the second point... His (the OP) are the rules, his are the pains. The true problem is that it could generate nearly equal colors. I wouldn't ever do something similar to this code for me. :-) I would do something based on the HSL space with minimum distance between colors (technically I already did this once) –  xanatos Mar 19 '11 at 12:55
    
By the way HashSet<T> exists since .net 3.5. –  CodesInChaos Mar 19 '11 at 12:59
    
@CodeInChaos You clearly are right... And it's funny, considering I began using C# 4.0 two months ago and I used HashSet last year :-) –  xanatos Mar 19 '11 at 13:06

I will populate a list of "used color", so everytime you generate a new color before calling Color.FromArgb you can check it in your list. If the color exists you will call again the random function else you generate the color and add the value to the list.

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Thanks, but how can I store a color in a list? –  Saeid Yazdani Mar 19 '11 at 11:52
    
You can create a simple POCO class of color. something like: public class MyColor { int Red {get;set;} int Green {get;set;} int Blue {get;set;}} then create in your function IList<MyColor> and than use Add, Delete or Linq statement to do your comparinsons. Or you use directly the Color class of the .NET framework (IList<Color>) –  Iridio Mar 19 '11 at 12:04

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