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The function is:

def createuser(name,pass,time)
   puts name,pass,time
end

I try:

handle_asynchronously :createuser("a","b","c")

and got a error:syntax error, unexpected '(', expecting keyword_end

thank you.

===EDIT===

user database in japen and web server in beijing. so i use this way to create a user.

def createuser(name,pass,time)
   Net::HTTP.get(URI.parse("http://www.example.net/builduser.php?hao=#{name}&mi=#{pass}&da=#{time}"))
end
share|improve this question
    
Thanks for the edit. Can you now show the calling part. Where do you call handle_asynchronously? Just after the declaration? Somewhere else? –  Amokrane Chentir Mar 19 '11 at 14:51
    
Hi. I'm using Unixmonkey's way.it's woring fine now. Thank you. –  jean Mar 19 '11 at 15:24

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You don't need to pass parameters into the handle_asynchronously method, it is just a way to say your method should always be passed into delayed_job.

So in your example:

def create_user(name,pass,time)
  puts name,pass,time
end
handle_asynchronously :create_user

does exactly what you need it to. When you call

create_user('john','foo',Time.now)

is the same thing as calling

delay.create_user('john','foo',Time.now)

I just setup a test app doing exactly this to test the answer, and here is the delayed_job serialized performable handler:

--- !ruby/struct:Delayed::PerformableMethod
object: !ruby/ActiveRecord:User
attributes: 
   name: 
   pass:
   created_at:
   updated_at: 
   method_name: :create_user_without_delay
     args: 
       - John
       - foo
       - 2011-03-19 10:45:40.290526 -04:00
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thanks!It's woring fine! –  jean Mar 19 '11 at 15:22

Why do you want to pass parameters to the method? Because the problem is * I think * that you are supposed to use it this way:

def create_user
  # do some delayed stuff here
end

handle_asynchronously :create_user, :run_at => Proc.new { 10.minutes.from_now }

Or

handle_asynchronously :create_user, :priority => 10

etc. (so without passing any parameters to the method that you pass as a parameter to handle_asynchronously).

EDIT

A delayed job is a long running task that you want to do asynchronously. handle_asynchronously is called one time, just after the method declaration, so passing parameters is useless because the code inside the method is sharing that scope as well!

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I want passing parameters.like this createuser("a","b","c").if i use handle_asynchronously i can't put parameters to createuser. –  jean Mar 19 '11 at 13:14
    
Yes, I think you can't that's the problem. I have browsed many examples using handle_asynchronously and none of them were passing parameters to the method. The question is where are you defining this method, why do you need to pass those parameters? What's the goal of doing it when using a delayed job? –  Amokrane Chentir Mar 19 '11 at 13:18
    
See my edit. I am curious about this myself, may be we can do it what you are asking for but on a design point of view why do you want to create ONE user asynchronously? –  Amokrane Chentir Mar 19 '11 at 13:32
    
Yes.i want to create ONE user asynchronously –  jean Mar 19 '11 at 14:09
    
It is not even a matter of number of users, but of passing 'constant' parameters to your method. If there are constant use them directly in your method without passing them. The handle_asynchronously method is called one time after the definition of the method. Can you show me what you are trying to accomplish? And take it easy :) –  Amokrane Chentir Mar 19 '11 at 14:23

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