Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to make an Euelr circle with a mehod that I wrote which uses class named Turtle.

This is what I wrote:

public class turtleAa {


public static void main(String[] args) {
int number = LineInput.readInt();
euelr(number);

}

public static void euelr(int n){

    Turtle leonardo = new Turtle();
    leonardo.tailDown();
    for (int i=1; i<=n; i++){
    leonardo.moveForward(50);
    leonardo.turnRight(90);
    leonardo.moveForward(50);
    leonardo.turnLeft(135);
    leonardo.moveForward(35);
    leonardo.turnLeft(90);
    leonardo.moveForward(35);
    leonardo.turnLeft(90);
    leonardo.moveForward(70.71067812);
    leonardo.turnLeft(135);
    leonardo.moveForward(50);
    leonardo.turnLeft(135);
    leonardo.moveForward(70.71067812);
    leonardo.turnLeft(135);
    leonardo.moveForward(50);
    leonardo.turnLeft(?)

}

}}

I want to make a full circle of Euler drawnings Two main problems with this:

Can't understad how to control correctly the angles with i and n.

leonardo the turtle is drawing the lines.

Thank you.

share|improve this question
    
By the way, could you add a link to your Turtle class? –  Paŭlo Ebermann Mar 19 '11 at 19:19
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

What about this?

leonardo.turnLeft(360/n);

This works only for divisors of 360, of course, but there are quite some of them (1,2,3,4,5,6,8,9,10,12,15,18,20...). If your turnLeft method accepts non-integer (i.e. double or float) values, use

leonardo.turnLeft(360.0/n);

Instead (and it will also work for 7, 11, ... - approximately.)

share|improve this answer
    
@Paulo: I also thought about 360.0/n.. It does not work. –  Unknown user Mar 19 '11 at 20:54
    
So, what does your Turtle class look like? I suppose you did not create it yourself, and it is not part of the standard API. Where does it come from? –  Paŭlo Ebermann Mar 19 '11 at 21:20
    
@paulo: ok, so we need to turn leonardo 90 degrees before what you suggested. –  Unknown user Mar 20 '11 at 1:15
add comment

What you want is the Fleury algorithm to find an Euler Circuit in (undirected)-weighted graph. The Fleury algorithm starts at a random position with a DFS and looks for the next edge to travel if that edge doesn't bridge the graph, meaning cutiing the graph in two parts. I'm not sure what you want to do with a turtle and mathematic? Can you elaborate?

share|improve this answer
    
As I linked, there's a santha claus drawing (the one that you draw without going over the same line twice). My mission is get input from the user that represents the number of draws that he wants, and I have to draw this amount of paintings. I can't realize how to do that in such way that the paintings will be in a full circle, I thought that in the end I should write leonardo.turnLeft(360/n), but when i tried that with a n=12 it was completly a mess. Did I get clear? maybe it's difficult to inform my problem with this kind of code. –  Unknown user Mar 19 '11 at 13:45
    
Sure - but in mathematic it is an Euler-Circuit most likely it is the name of your program and when you want that the user interact with your program i.e. draw many points you will need a graph representation of it somewhere and that is why you want the Fleury algorithm. –  Phpdna Mar 19 '11 at 13:54
    
Or maybe you want to draw a hilbert-curve? Then you want to use a recursive approach to sub-divide the space and iterative fractal system? –  Phpdna Mar 19 '11 at 17:06
    
This is what I want: img405.imageshack.us/i/thisg.jpg –  Unknown user Mar 19 '11 at 17:44
    
It's just a matter of what we do with my i and n.. a game with the angles.. –  Unknown user Mar 19 '11 at 17:45
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.