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Is it possible to wrap a raw C++ pointer in a smart pointer-like class, which will allow a user to update using familiar operators such as array and indirection:

int i;
my_ptr<int> ptr(i);
ptr[i] = 42;

yet, will absolutely deny that user access to the underlying raw addresses. So, this should not succeed:

int *p;
p = &ptr[i];

Alas, I fear I may be asking the impossible. I could use getter and setter methods, but I'm curious if I can do without.

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1  
What parameters should you constructor to my_prt<int> accept? If your ptr is a (smart) pointer to &i, the index operator makes no sense. –  harper Mar 19 '11 at 13:02

8 Answers 8

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Filter access through a proxy class, such as this(incomplete example):

template<typename T>
class proxy
{
    proxy(T & v) :value_(v) {}
    proxy & operator=(const T & v) { value_ = v; return *this; }
private:
    T & value_;
};

That class needs some more work, but once complete, if your operator[] returns one of those, it can be assigned to from a T, but you can't get the address of the T.

Edit

Thanks for the votes guys. But this answer isn't quite as good as you think. It won't allow the user to do any other operations than those defined in the proxy. So, for example, this wouldn't work:

my_ptr<int> ptr(x);
...
ptr[i]++;

Unless the proxy class was specialized for each type, and who wants to do that?

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Yes. This is a good way to go. It solves the problem and is a good way to go. One would also hope that with optimizations turned on all this code will disappear. –  edA-qa mort-ora-y Mar 19 '11 at 13:39
    
You would probably also want to make the proxy(T & v) constructor private and make the smart pointer class a friend of this one. It might also make sense for the proxy to maintain a reference counted version of the value type to make sure the data it is holding doesn't get destroyed from out under it. –  lefticus Mar 19 '11 at 13:40
    
And add void operator&() const {} to the proxy. –  Sergey Shandar Mar 19 '11 at 13:48
    
why not implement operator++ in the proxy, then your example will work... –  smerlin Mar 19 '11 at 15:01
    
@smerlin: You also want to implement --? And += and -= and *= and /= and every other operation that can be applied to integers? Okay, fine. But now you've got a smart pointer class that only works for integers. Not very useful. –  Benjamin Lindley Mar 19 '11 at 15:06

Even if you succeed in suppressing a get() method, you won't be able to stop people doing this:

smart_ptr<C> ptr(new C);
C* raw = ptr.operator->();

or

ptr.operator->().operator->()

etc, as needed. It doesn't matter how many proxies are in between: in order for the syntax ptr->f() to work, this sequence has to bottom out at a raw pointer eventually.

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I believe STL iterators are good example of how it can be done as transparently as possible, yet keeping the additional functionality. The most weird to overload is probaby the -> operator.

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No, it cannot be done. You cannot have both the functionality that enables ptr[i] = 42 and also forbids int* p = &ptr[i]. How could you? The first one requires direct access to the data, which will necessarily also open up the possibility to reference the data.

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1  
Not necessailry: ptr[i] could return some kind of object Ref<T> that has operator=(T) defined, but not T& operator&(). –  CygnusX1 Mar 19 '11 at 21:31

No. I believe the best option is writing it in the documentation and hoping whoever uses your pointer class sticks to your rules.

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You can't do this. With your code ptr[i] you get a reference to a value of the type T. You area always free to take the address of this.

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2  
See Benjamin's answer, simply don't return the T object directly. –  edA-qa mort-ora-y Mar 19 '11 at 13:40

I would loathe the man who do that!

Proper encapsulation requires that a method be only defined with the minimal information necessary so that it may accomplish its task, and nothing more.

Let us take an hypothetical type struct Foo { unsigned id; std::string name; };

Now, let's define a simple (and straightforward) pair of methods to return the id of Foo.

  • unsigned getId(Foo const& foo) { return foo.id; }
  • unsigned getId(Foo const* foo) { return foo ? foo->id : 0; }

Does any of these methods needs to know whether Foo is allocated on the stack ? Within a vector or within a smart pointer ?

No, it does not. I only requires whether a pointer or a reference to accomplish its stack, and that this reference be valid for the duration of the method, of course. It needs not concern itself with the object life-time.

There is also the issue of... interface explosion. Would you want to write an overload of this method for any kind of smart pointer in the world ? I don't.

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I guess it's cheeky for me to give an answer, but I thought it up after posing the question, and it gives a fresh chance to get feedback. I include the code and a little micro-benchmark result.

So, my trick is that the [] operator and its ilk return the type of the smart pointer, rather than the element type, and by value. I reasoned that returning a 4-byte my_ptr by value is no worse than a 4-byte element reference.

inline my_ptr operator[](int i) const { return my_ptr(m_p+i); }

I've only added a few basic operators, but I think the pattern could be continued as required. Perhaps Boost already has something like this?

template <typename T>
class my_ptr {
  T *m_p;
public:
  inline my_ptr(T *p) : m_p(p) {}
  inline my_ptr operator[](int i) const { return my_ptr(m_p+i); } // By value
  inline my_ptr & operator= (T x) { *m_p = x; }
  inline my_ptr & operator= (my_ptr &x) { *m_p = *x.m_p; }
  inline my_ptr & operator+=(const my_ptr &x) { *m_p = *m_p + *x.m_p; }
  inline friend ostream &operator<<(ostream &o, const my_ptr &x) {
    o << *x.m_p;
    return o;
  }
};

I benchmark by summing an array of SIZE elements NRUNS times using gcc 4.4.5 with the -O3 switch, and SIZE and NRUNS equal to 1 << 15. On my crappy machine both take 3.45 seconds. The kernel looks like this:

s += data[i];

The bulk of the code is here:

#define NRUNS (1<<15)
#define SIZE  (1<<15)
double data[SIZE];

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
  double s, t1, t2;
  my_ptr<double> s2(&s);
  my_ptr<double> data2(data);

  s = 0;
  t1 = omp_get_wtime();
  for (int n = 0; n < NRUNS; n++)
  for (int i = 0; i < SIZE; ++i)
    s += data[i];
  t2 = omp_get_wtime();
  cout << "sum=" << s << " " << "t2-t1=" << t2-t1 << "secs." << endl;

  s2 = 0;
  t1 = omp_get_wtime();
  for (int n = 0; n < NRUNS; n++)
  for (int i = 0; i < SIZE; ++i)
    s2 += data2[i];
  t2 = omp_get_wtime();
  cout << "sum=" << s2 << " " << "t2-t1=" << t2-t1 << "secs." << endl;
  return 0;
}

I also added a version inspired by Benjamin Lindley's "proxy" solution. The declarations added to main are:

proxy<double> s3(s);  
my_ptr2<double> data3(data);

while the proxy class and smart pointer (my_ptr2) are declared as:

template<typename T>
struct proxy
{
  proxy(T & v) :value_(v) {}
  proxy & operator =(const T & v) { value_  = v; return *this; }
  proxy & operator+=(const T & v) { value_ += v; return *this; }
  proxy & operator+=(const proxy & x) { value_ += x.value_; return *this; }
private:
  T & value_;
};

template <typename T>
class my_ptr2 {
  T *m_p;
public:
  inline my_ptr2(T *p) : m_p(p) {}
  inline proxy<T> operator[](int i) const {
    return proxy<T>(m_p[i]);
  }
  inline friend ostream &operator<<(ostream &o, const my_ptr2 &x) {
    o << *x.m_p;
    return o;
  }
};

The core of the kernel is now:

s = 0;
t1 = omp_get_wtime();
for (int n = 0; n < NRUNS; n++)
for (int i = 0; i < SIZE; ++i)
  s3 += data3[i];
t2 = omp_get_wtime();
cout << "sum=" << s << " " << "t2-t1=" << t2-t1 << "secs." << endl;

and lo with -O3 it runs as quickly as the other two versions. I like it as, once developed, it would clearly separate the update of the smart pointer from its target data. On the other hand, it may feel a little cumbersome to the user. This may still be acceptable: assuming my initial condition that the pointer should absolutely not be accessed directly.

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