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I've written a script that will export all the users, blogs and replies from an existing (non-wordpress) site to a wordpress extended rss file for ease of importing into a new wordpress installation, as part of a migration. This works well until it comes to a particular blog post with a special punctuation mark in a French or French Canadian phrase.

XML Parsing Error: not well-formed
Location: http://example.com/wordpress_xml/export-to-wp.php
Line Number 2000, Column 270:* ... <i>l'art du d\uffffplacement</i> ... 

I've cropped the full error above. Instead of \uffff a character similar to a comma is shown. In the php code I have the html of the blog in a string. I need to encode this type of character without encoding any of the html tags, and after a lot of searching I so far drawn a blank. Anyone already done something like this?

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Okay, I've looked into this a bit further and would add the character is supposes to be an e with an accent over the top. This renders fine on the original site but throws a wobbly when exported to xml. I think this means what I really need is to encode accented characters but not html tags... –  AntonChanning Mar 19 '11 at 13:16
    
Which character encoding does your content have? –  mario Mar 19 '11 at 13:33
    
@mario, not sure but I managed to solved this one for myself, see below. Funny how I was stuck until I posed this as a question. It happens to me all the time... –  AntonChanning Mar 19 '11 at 13:42
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2 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

For Latin-1 you can escape characters easily with:

$html = preg_replace('/[\x80-\xFF]/e', '"&#x".dechex(ord("$0")).";"', $html);

For UTF-8 it's a bit more involving:

$html = preg_replace_callback("/(?!\w)\p{L}/u", "xmlent", $html);
function xmlent($m) {
    $str = mb_convert_encoding( $m[0] , "UCS-2BE", "UTF-8");
    return "&#x" . bin2hex($str) . ";";
}
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Ah wait, this looks even better than my solution. I'm guessing this would handle all characters, from any unicode supported alphabet? –  AntonChanning Mar 19 '11 at 13:45
    
Indeed. It doesn't rely on a fixed list, but should be able to handle all Unicode characters. Use the second version, and maybe apply $html=utf8_encode($html); beforehand in your case. –  mario Mar 19 '11 at 13:47
    
I should do that, as I plan to release this export code for others who want to migrate to wordpress from the same cms, and I have no idea what character encoding they might use. May as well make it as universally useful as possible. Thanks! –  AntonChanning Mar 19 '11 at 13:50
    
Then take care to also use mb_detect_encoding() to avoid double conversions, and the preg_replace might be confused by non-UTF8 strings. –  mario Mar 19 '11 at 14:02
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After discovering the problem was about accents, I found the following functions posted on php.net, and they worked for my case, and the export file I generated imported nicely into a wordpress blog.

function xmlentities($string) {
    // Function from: http://php.net/manual/en/function.htmlentities.php
    // Posted by: snevi at im dot com dot ve 22-Jul-2008 01:10
    $string = preg_replace('/[^\x09\x0A\x0D\x20-\x7F]/e', '_privateXMLEntities("$0")', $string);
    return $string;
}

function _privateXMLEntities($num) {
    // Function from: http://php.net/manual/en/function.htmlentities.php
    // Posted by: snevi at im dot com dot ve 22-Jul-2008 01:10
        $chars = array(
    128 => '&#8364;',
    130 => '&#8218;',
    131 => '&#402;',
    132 => '&#8222;',
    133 => '&#8230;',
    134 => '&#8224;',
    135 => '&#8225;',
    136 => '&#710;',
    137 => '&#8240;',
    138 => '&#352;',
    139 => '&#8249;',
    140 => '&#338;',
    142 => '&#381;',
    145 => '&#8216;',
    146 => '&#8217;',
    147 => '&#8220;',
    148 => '&#8221;',
    149 => '&#8226;',
    150 => '&#8211;',
    151 => '&#8212;',
    152 => '&#732;',
    153 => '&#8482;',
    154 => '&#353;',
    155 => '&#8250;',
    156 => '&#339;',
    158 => '&#382;',
    159 => '&#376;');
    $num = ord($num);
    return (($num > 127 && $num < 160) ? $chars[$num] : "&#".$num.";" );
} 
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