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I am rather confused, because my trigger in SQL Server cannot insert the value what I expected it would. The situation is as follows :

  • I have transaction table which can have two types of transactions in it - saldo and buy. If it is saldo, the trigger in transaction table will insert the amount of the transaction total to saldo table, but with Debit in its saldo_type field.

  • So if the case in transaction table is buy, the same amount will be inserted in saldo table, but with credit in its saldo_type field.

What confuses me is that the trigger will only insert the correct amount of value if the situation is saldo, but not if the situation is buy

What did I do wrong? Here is the code:

declare @last_saldo int
declare @transaction_ammount int

set @last_saldo = (select sum(saldo_ammount) from saldo)
if @last_saldo is null set @last_saldo=0

set @transaction_ammount = (select transaction_ammount from inserted)
IF (select transaction_type from inserted) = 'Saldo'
begin
/* this will insert correct amount */
INSERT INTO saldo
    (id_transaction,transaction_type,saldo_ammount,saldo)
SELECT id_transaction,'Debit',@transaction_ammount,@last_saldo + @transaction_ammount
FROM inserted
RETURN 
END else IF (select transaction_type from inserted)='Buy'
begin
    /* this will not insert the correct ammount. It will always zero! */
INSERT INTO saldo
    (id_transaction,transaction_type,saldo_ammount,saldo)
SELECT id_transaction,'Credit',@transction_ammount,(@last_saldo - @transaction_ammount)
FROM inserted
RETURN 
END 

Many Thanks!

share|improve this question
1  
OK, first of all - it's spelled "amount" with just one "m" - you consistently misspell it with two "mm". Second: the Inserted table can hold more than one row - however, your code only ever assumes a single entry in that Inserted column - you need to fix that! –  marc_s Mar 19 '11 at 23:16
1  
:) thanks for the editing of the mistyped variable. Actually, the code was in Bahasa Indonesia, so before pasted it here, I think it should be better if I translate it. Many thanks for pointing it out! –  swdev Mar 20 '11 at 12:39
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1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Perhaps you can refactor your trigger to be a bit simpler:

declare @last_saldo int

select @last_saldo = ISNULL(sum(saldo_ammount),0)
 from saldo

INSERT INTO saldo
        (id_transaction,transaction_type,saldo_ammount,saldo)

    SELECT id_transaction,
           CASE WHEN transaction_type = 'Saldo' 
             THEN 'Debit'
             ELSE 'Credit' 
           END,
           transaction_ammount,
           CASE WHEN transaction_type = 'Saldo' 
             THEN (@last_saldo + transaction_ammount)
             ELSE (@last_saldo - transaction_ammount)
           END
    FROM inserted
RETURN

Is the problem of zero solved with this code? If not, determine what @last_saldo and transaction_ammount values are. That'll lead you to the root of your problem.

Caveat: be aware that inserted can have more than one row!

share|improve this answer
    
:) Many thanks for rewriting my trigger. This is my first time in using MS SQL trigger, I use to do trigger in My SQL before. I apply your trigger here, and the result is the same. But.. after I inspect the code, it turn out that, I insert 0 for the transaction ammount, but then I updated it to the correct ammount. And because my trigger only handled INSERT even, ... well, you know the error that happened... :) Many thanks for this. I accepted is the answer, and I learn a lot by comparing my first trigger, and your trigger Code. Perfect! –  swdev Mar 20 '11 at 12:44
    
I just know that inserted can have more than one row. If it's, to make the trigger bullet proof, what will be the modification?thanks –  swdev Mar 20 '11 at 15:47
    
@swdev: This solution seems to handle multiple rows very well, and the caution about multiple rows in inserted at the end of this answer is simply meant for you as a general reminder. That is, every time you are writing a trigger in SQL Server, remember to always treat the 'magic' tables inserted and deleted as having more than one row. –  Andriy M Mar 20 '11 at 19:24
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