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I have been stucked in a strange problem. I am using org.apache.http.impl.client.HttpClient api for an XML and media transfer beetween two web sites, now while reading a binary content (image in my case) from the web using DefaultHttpClient only 1.9 kb of the image is saved. The problem is strange because the code works fine on my development environment (windows and ubuntu linux), but appears only on my production environment that is SUSE linux.

below is the code i have used to save the file.

HttpResponse response = defaultHttpClient.execute(request);
InputStream stream = response.getEntity().getContent();
byte[] buffer = new byte[10024];
int count = stream.read(buffer);
buffer = Arrays.copyOf(buffer, count);
FileOutputStream fstream = new FileOutputStream("myFile.jpeg",true);
fstream.write(buffer, 0, count);
fstream.flush();
fstream.close();
stream.close();

Any help will be appreciated.

Thanks
Shailesh.

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Is request an HttpGet or HttpPost? –  Buhake Sindi Mar 19 '11 at 17:26

3 Answers 3

You should be checking for the content length of your response before creating your byte buffer.

Secondly, you should be checking to see how many bytes were read in the variable count.

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i am suured that my image size will not be more then 5kb.. –  gopal Mar 19 '11 at 17:29
    
i am sure that my image size will not be more then 5kb, still for safer side and due to this problem i have taken the size of my byte array to 10024.. and before writing in to the file i am creating a copy of the same array of the size that were read from response. and hence i am writing only that much bytes that were actually read from the response. main confusion is that the same code works fine on windows and ubuntu linux. –  gopal Mar 19 '11 at 17:38

Your problem is you just reading your buffer.length data (which is 10024) bytes and you're not reading the rest.

Do something of this effect:

HttpResponse response = defaultHttpClient.execute(request);
InputStream stream = response.getEntity().getContent();
FileOutputStream fstream = new FileOutputStream("myFile.jpeg",true);
byte[] buffer = new byte[10024];
int count = -1;
while ((count = stream.read(buffer)) != -1) {
    fstream.write(buffer);
}
fstream.flush();
fstream.close();
stream.close();

Plus, I would close all my Closeable objects in a finally try-finally block (for guarantee).

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as i told before also that my image size not going to be more then 5000 bytes so i don't need to go for the loop reading as the initial size of the array is more then enough to read my 5000 bytes. don't know why the InputStream on the response content is reading 1984 bytes only on my production server. and yes actually my original code is too long and try-finally block is there it is not present here to keep simplicity. :-) –  gopal Mar 19 '11 at 18:04
    
The HttpResponse.getContentLength(), are you sure it's returning a length less than (or equal to) 5000 bytes? –  Buhake Sindi Mar 19 '11 at 18:38
    
Hey finally i have got the solution.. In My production server media contents were by default compressed in to GZ formate so uncompressing the image solved the problem. –  gopal Mar 20 '11 at 8:26

public int read(byte[] b)
         throws IOException

Reads some number of bytes from the input stream and stores them into the buffer array b.


Your understanding of the #read method's contract is wrong. There is no guarantee that the read method will retrieve the entire response content in one invocation, even if it is really small. One must keep on reading from the input stream until the end of stream (read operation returns -1)

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