Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

What do you name a variable that is a boolean but can have 2 meaningful values out of N?

Example: x can have values "red" or "blue".

Calling it bRed, or isRed, is meaningful if he value is true , but doesn't convey any info about the "false" case.

YOu could implement it as an int, or if you are picky, as an enum. But this means more lines of code to declare the enum, etc.

I thought of "redOrBlue", but logically speaking, the value is always true :)

What do you think of "redNotBlue"? Any better ideas?

share|improve this question
    
I tried using an enum, but it adds a lot more code. The situation was 1 of 2 radio buttons. Normally I would just pass the value of radiobutton1.Checked as a parameter. Using an enum means I have to loop through the controls of the groupbox, find the checked radio button, map that to an enumerated value, then handle the enum on the function side with a switch statement. –  Larry Watanabe Mar 19 '11 at 18:24
    
Couldn't you just say radiobutton1.Checked ? ColorEnum.Red : ColorEnum.Blue? And on the other end, if(color == ColorEnum.Red)? –  Aaron Mar 19 '11 at 21:02
add comment

5 Answers 5

up vote 7 down vote accepted

You should probably be using an enum in this case.

enum EntityColors
{
  blue,
  red
};
share|improve this answer
    
Beat me to it ;-) I agree, I think in this particular case, an enum is appropriate, since there is no meaning conveyed by 'true' or 'false.' –  Pandincus Mar 19 '11 at 17:40
    
I already considered that, but it means more lines of code for something that isn't any more typesafe or clear. I'll reconsider though. –  Larry Watanabe Mar 19 '11 at 17:43
1  
@Larry, also think about it later you decide you want to add another color. Is your variable going to be named RedNotBlueNotYellow? Or if IsRed is false, does that mean it's blue or yellow? Using enums it's very easy to maintain as well as read. –  jb. Mar 19 '11 at 17:49
    
See my comment above. I think this is a case where it's not worth it to build in extendability for a case that may never happen. –  Larry Watanabe Mar 19 '11 at 18:25
add comment

Just use an enum in this case, it's the most expressive:

public enum ColorValue { Red, Blue };
share|improve this answer
    
already considered that, but it means more lines of code for something that isn't any more typesafe or clear. I'll reconsider though. –  Larry Watanabe Mar 19 '11 at 17:43
    
@Larry: It's certainly more readable though - you will know exactly what you're dealing with looking at the code, the same can't be said for a boolean. Also, you can much easier extend the value set. –  BrokenGlass Mar 19 '11 at 17:44
    
I think an enum is really more clear. What would you make of some code you inherited where there's a boolean variable declared somewhere with the "most expressive" name 'falseMeansATrueMeansB'? –  bottlenecked Mar 19 '11 at 17:48
add comment

More lines of code didn't hurt a developer yet. A poorly typed and named variable did. Go and use an enumeration type and use boolean only where it makes sense — i.e. yes/no, true/false logic.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Maybe you want to solve an other problem.

For example you have a print function

void print(string text, bool red) {...}

Red are important entrys all others are blue. Why not changing the variable name to something more meaningful

void print(string text, bool isImportant) {...} 

This would make the API more clear and as soon you change your important color to say orange you don't have to change your variable name.

share|improve this answer
add comment

This should certainly be defined as an enum.

Your question is "What do you name a variable that is a boolean but can have 2 meaningful values out of N? Example: x can have values "red" or "blue".

A boolean can have two values, "true" or "false". In your example the two possible vales are "red" or "blue", so this dosn't look like a good candidate for a boolean variable.

Implementing as an enum is more lines of code, but is likely to be more extensible and more maintainable in that it's intention will be clear to future developers consuming your code, and so worth the (minor) implementation cost.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.