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Is it possible to get a method name from an action? I know I could always pass a string, but I was hoping for something a little more clever.

    public bool DeviceCommand(Action apiCall)
    {
        //It would be nice to log the method name that was passed in
        try
        {
            apiCall();
        }
        catch (Exception exc)
        {
            LogException(exc);
            return false;
        }        

        return true;
    }  

Usage looks like this:

void MyMethod()
(
     DeviceCommand(() => api.WriteConfig(config));
)
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2  
That's a LINQ expression, what do you think should be reported? What should it be if it was DeviceCommand(() => (standard ? api.WriteConfig(config) : api.WriteExtendedConfig(config))); –  tvanfosson Mar 19 '11 at 20:01
    
Are you saying that it's impossible to accomplish what I want without passing some sort of parameter because it's a LINQ expression? –  Robert Mar 19 '11 at 20:58
    
no, just pointing out that just because your example is simple, the general problem isn't because Action could be a variety of things, including any qualifying code block. I'd probably be ok with not logging the call, but simply making sure I include the stack trace if there is an exception. Or just log the call in each method if you want to keep track of the calls. –  tvanfosson Mar 19 '11 at 21:13

2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

If your invocations of DeviceCommand are always going to be of the form

DeviceCommand(() => someObject.SomeMethod(parameters));

then you could modify DeviceCommand to take an expression tree as a parameter. This would allow you to drill down into the tree to get the information you want (in this case, the string "SomeMethod"), then compile the tree into a delegate and execute it:

public bool DeviceCommand(Expression<Action> apiCallExp)
{
    var methodCallExp = (MethodCallExpression) apiCallExp.Body;
    string methodName = methodCallExp.Method.Name;
    // do whatever you want with methodName

    Action apiCall = apiCallExp.Compile();
    try
    {
        apiCall();
    }
    catch(Exception exc)
    {
        LogException(exc);
        return false;
    }

    return true;
}

Of course, building and compiling an expression tree every time could be a major performance issue (or not--it just depends on how often DeviceCommand is called). You'll have to decide if the performance implications (and general "hack"ishness of this approach) are worth it in your situation.

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Yes there is: Action.Method.Name

[EDITED]

However, this only works if you pass in the Action parameter as a method group, not as a lambda expression:

class Program
{
    static void SomeActionName(){}

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        LogMethodName(() => SomeActionName()); // <Main>b__0
        LogMethodName(SomeActionName); // SomeActionName

        var instance = new SomeClass();
        LogMethodName(() => instance.SomeClassMethod());; // <Main>b__1
        LogMethodName(instance.SomeClassMethod); // SomeClassMethod


    }

    private static void LogMethodName(Action action)
    {
        Console.WriteLine(action.Method.Name);
    }
}

class SomeClass
{
    public void SomeClassMethod(){}
}
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3  
That works only if the apiCall delegate directly references the method you're interested in. In particular, in the OP's own example (DeviceCommand(() => api.WriteConfig(config));) apiCall.Method.Name would not be "WriteConfig". apiCall.Method would refer to the anonymous method created from the lambda expression, whose name would be something like "<SomeMethod>b__0". –  Aaron Mar 19 '11 at 20:21
    
@Aaron, that's entirely correct, I'll add your remark to my answer –  jeroenh Mar 19 '11 at 20:44
    
Action.Method.Name is returning the anonymous method name of the method that DeviceCommand() is contained in, not the actual api call. For example, Action.Method.Name returns MyMethod instead of WriteConfig. I updated my example usage to show this. –  Robert Mar 19 '11 at 20:52
    
@Aaron, @Robert: I just tested this, it only works if you pass the Action parameter as a 'method group', not as a lambda expression. For the latter, you need Aarons approach of passing in an Expression –  jeroenh Mar 19 '11 at 21:01

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