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I have two versions of this code. In one version if the user inputs the phrase "GET /index.html" the server responds properly. In the second version, the "GET /index.html" phrase is built in without prompting the user. The second version hangs when reading a response from the server, any idea why?

First Version - Prompts user for phrase

#include <stdio.h> 
#include <strings.h> 
#include <stdlib.h> 
#include <sys/types.h> 
#include <sys/socket.h> 
#include <netinet/in.h> 
#include <netdb.h>
#include <unistd.h>

void error(char *msg) 
{ 
    perror(msg); 
    exit(0); 
}

int main(int argc, char *argv[]) 
{ 
    int sockfd, portno, n;

    struct sockaddr_in serv_addr; 
    struct hostent *server;

    char buffer[10000]; 


    portno = atoi("85"); 
    sockfd = socket(AF_INET, SOCK_STREAM, 0); 
    if (sockfd < 0) 
        error((char *)"ERROR opening socket"); 

    server = gethostbyname("vilive.us"); 
    if (server == NULL) { 
        fprintf(stderr,"ERROR, no such host\n"); 
        exit(0); 
    }

    memset((char *) &serv_addr, 0, sizeof(serv_addr)); 
    serv_addr.sin_family = AF_INET; 
    memcpy((char *)&serv_addr.sin_addr.s_addr, (char *)server->h_addr, server->h_length); 
    serv_addr.sin_port = htons(portno); 
    if (connect(sockfd,(struct sockaddr *)&serv_addr,sizeof(serv_addr)) < 0) 
        error((char *)"ERROR connecting");

    printf("Please enter the message: "); 
    memset(buffer,0,256); 
    fgets(buffer,255,stdin); 

    n = write(sockfd,buffer,strlen(buffer)); 
    if (n < 0) 
        error((char *)"ERROR writing to socket"); 

    memset(buffer,0,256); 
    n = read(sockfd,buffer,500); 
    if (n < 0) 
        error((char *)"ERROR reading from socket"); 
    printf("%s\n",buffer); 
    return 0; 
} 

Second Version - Automatically sends "GET /index.html" - This one hangs

#include <stdio.h> 
#include <strings.h> 
#include <stdlib.h> 
#include <sys/types.h> 
#include <sys/socket.h> 
#include <netinet/in.h> 
#include <netdb.h>
#include <unistd.h>

void error(char *msg) 
{ 
    perror(msg); 
    exit(0); 
}

int main(int argc, char *argv[]) 
{ 
    int sockfd, portno, n;

    struct sockaddr_in serv_addr; 
    struct hostent *server;

    char buffer[10000]; 

    //TEST
    char getI[16];
    getI[0]='G';
    getI[1]='E';
    getI[2]='T';
    getI[3]=' ';
    getI[4]='/';
    getI[5]='i';
    getI[6]='n';
    getI[7]='d';
    getI[8]='e';
    getI[9]='x';
    getI[10]='.';
    getI[11]='h';
    getI[12]='t';
    getI[13]='m';
    getI[14]='l';
    getI[15]='\0';


    portno = atoi("85"); 
    sockfd = socket(AF_INET, SOCK_STREAM, 0); 
    if (sockfd < 0) 
        error((char *)"ERROR opening socket"); 

    server = gethostbyname("vilive.us"); 
    if (server == NULL) { 
        fprintf(stderr,"ERROR, no such host\n"); 
        exit(0); 
    }

    memset((char *) &serv_addr, 0, sizeof(serv_addr)); 
    serv_addr.sin_family = AF_INET; 
    memcpy((char *)&serv_addr.sin_addr.s_addr, (char *)server->h_addr, server->h_length); 
    serv_addr.sin_port = htons(portno); 
    if (connect(sockfd,(struct sockaddr *)&serv_addr,sizeof(serv_addr)) < 0) 
        error((char *)"ERROR connecting");

    /*printf("Please enter the message: "); 
    memset(buffer,0,256); 
    fgets(buffer,255,stdin);*/ 

    n = write(sockfd,getI,strlen(getI)); 
    if (n < 0) 
        error((char *)"ERROR writing to socket"); 

    memset(buffer,0,256); 
    n = read(sockfd,buffer,500); 
    if (n < 0) 
        error((char *)"ERROR reading from socket"); 
    printf("%s\n",buffer); 
    return 0; 
} 
share|improve this question
1  
portno = atoi("85"); ?! –  larsmans Mar 19 '11 at 21:37
    
Yes, it's a private server and my isp blocks port 80. So I'm running a web server on port 85. Also, this is a quick mod of code, not sure why I'm even using atoi()... –  vilive Mar 19 '11 at 21:40
    
Why are you using such an antique version of the HTTP protcol ? It's even amazing that your server agrees to reply, mine don't. Seriously, switch to at least HTTP/1.0 if not HTTP/1.1 –  BatchyX Mar 19 '11 at 21:57
    
This was just a quick test, I no almost nothing about the HTTP protocol. I'm planning to use this code for a Microcontroller project. –  vilive Mar 20 '11 at 5:16
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2 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The request must be terminated with 2 carriage return and line feed pairs, this is missing in your second example.

char charI[] = "GET /index.html\r\n\r\n";
share|improve this answer
1  
+1. In the first case the \r is likely missing too, but the server seems to ignore that. –  larsmans Mar 19 '11 at 21:42
    
+1 for using non-silly form for initializing the char array. –  Robᵩ Mar 19 '11 at 22:04
    
Thanks, this helped. –  vilive Mar 20 '11 at 5:10
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Please, switch to a modern version of HTTP. I find it amazing that your server agrees to reply, as the request isn't remotely valid HTTP.

This would be a suitable HTTP/1.1 request in your situation

char charI[] = "GET /index.html HTTP/1.1\r\nHost: vilive.us\r\nConnection: close\r\n\r\n";

note the Host header, that allow you to talk with sites that do virtual hosting, like ... stackoverflow.com and superuser.com that points to the same ip address. they only rely on the Host header to figure out if the user want to access stackoverflow.com or superuser.com.

Also, your should close the socket descriptor when you are done using the socket.

share|improve this answer
    
Point taken :p Thank you –  vilive Mar 20 '11 at 5:16
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