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I have an entity with a date field and I would like to select the records for a given year. How to build a NSPredicate for the job? Didn't find anything about date functions (if any) in Core Data

thanks

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

A possible method:

Step 1) See "Creating a Date from Components" from Apple's "Date and Time Programming Guide." Make an NSDate representing the beginning of the year, and an NSDate representing the end of the year.

Step 2) Then you could build a predicate that searches for objects with date attrs that are greater than the first date and less than the last date.

The predicate would look something like this:

NSPredicate *predicate = [NSPredicate predicateWithFormat:@“(inceptionDate > %@) AND (inceptionDate < %@)”, dateBeginYear, dateEndYear];
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Indeed I just tried something like that and it is working but the idea of Rog seems cleaner –  kindoblue Mar 19 '11 at 23:56
    
As ever, there is always a clean, nice, elegant solution to every problem, but it is wrong :-) The idea suggested by Rog was not possible to follow: a predicate based on transient properties cannot be –  kindoblue Mar 20 '11 at 14:09
    
@kindoblue: Thanks for posting the complete, acrobatic answer. I’ve tucked it away for reference. And I wonder if you couldn’t still do something with a transient attr, setting it during all that work you’re doing with the fetch, after which the transient data would make it easy to manipulate the date info of the cached objects. –  Wienke Mar 20 '11 at 21:45
    
I was about to ask a very similar question, but I'll just add the Q&A as a comment here. I wanted to compare just the date (not the time) of an NSDate property to 'now' to see if the date was an earlier calendar date than 'today', rather than seeing if the full date value was earlier than 'now'. Answer: see if the date in question is before 12:00 AM of [NSDate date] ('now'). Hope that's useful to someone :) –  jinglesthula Jun 25 '11 at 6:37

I'm not into iPhone programming but I found this post on SO : how-to-store-dates-without-times-in-core-data

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Eventually I did more or less as suggested by Wienke. To create the predicate that fetches the records for a certain year(s), I did like this:

- (NSPredicate*) predicateFromYear:(NSInteger)start span:(NSInteger)aSpan {
NSCalendar *cal = [NSCalendar currentCalendar];
NSDateComponents *dc = [NSDateComponents new];

[dc setYear:start];

NSDate *startDate,*endDate;

startDate = [cal dateFromComponents:dc];
[dc setYear:aSpan];
endDate = [cal
           dateByAddingComponents:dc
           toDate:startDate
           options:0];

[dc release];
return [NSPredicate predicateWithFormat:
        @"date >= CAST(%f, \"NSDate\") AND date < CAST(%f, \"NSDate\")",
        [startDate timeIntervalSinceReferenceDate],
        [endDate timeIntervalSinceReferenceDate]];  }
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The cast to NSDate did the trick for me, thanks! –  Arno van der Meer Jun 6 '13 at 8:50

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