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My first question here. :)

I'm looking for a transitions between two images where the image first shrinks in a circle shape and then the circle grows again containing the other image. It's hard to explain, and I may be using the wrong words, because I can't find anything about it on the Interwebz.

I'm talking about an effect like the Loony Toons ending. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZuYIq-J5l9I

That shrinking-to-black, can it be done in JavaScript/JQuery?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

TL:DR

How do I even begin to describe this one? It would be a lot easier if the CSS 2 clip standard supported anything besides a "rect" value, namely a "circle" or "ellipse" but... since that doesn't exist, I've done my best to piece something together that will do what you're asking. The caveats are many. One is that this is only going to work on something with a solid color background in the event you wanted the picture to clip to the background. Another is that while I've tried to account for the CSS update timing across browsers, the rendering still isn't "perfect." My initial approach was to simply animate the clip on the image that was getting replaced, but that didn't work due to the way updates were made to the clipping via the easing function in the plugin I located. The final approach is below.

The Approach

The concept is to set the image as a background-image property of a container like a <div> with a background-position of center center, and the position of the container to relative, or anything non-static. The next is to generate the clipping elements as children of the container. The first is a position: absolute clipping circle image of the color of your background, either transparent PNG or GIF (I prefer the former), and the next four are divs, also with absolute positions that have left, right, top, and bottom attributes set to 0 for each of the respective sides they will clip. The idea is to animate the top, left, width, and height of the clipping circle image and synch up the width and height of the clipping divs using the step callback option of the .animate() call by matching them to the current left and top values. Between animations, you change the background-image of the container to the new image and then start the animation back in the opposite direction.

This required a little finessing in IE7, 8, and Webkit browsers as the animation clipped much more cleanly in Firefox and IE9. This would be the adjust variable you'll see in the working demo.

The sample code is below:

The Markup

<div class="imageContainer image1">
    <img class="clip" src="http://www.mysite.com/images/clipCircle.png" />
    <div class="top fill"></div>
    <div class="left fill"></div>
    <div class="right fill"></div>
    <div class="bottom fill"></div>
</div>

The CSS

div.imageContainer
{
    background-position: center;
    width: 300px;
    height: 300px;
    position: relative;
}

img.clip
{
    width: 100%;
    height: 100%;
    position: absolute;
}

div.fill
{
    position: absolute;
    background-color: White;
}

div.left, div.right
{
    height: 100%;
    top: 0;
    width: 0;
}

div.left
{
    left: 0;
}

div.right
{
    right: 0;
}

div.top, div.bottom
{
    width: 100%;
    left: 0;
    height: 0;
}

div.top
{
    top: 0;
}

div.bottom
{
    bottom: 0;
}

The Script

var speed = 1000;

$clip = $("img.clip");

$clip.animate({
    top: $clip.parent().height() / 2,
    left: $clip.parent().width() / 2,
    width: 0,
    height: 0
}, {
    duration: speed,
    step: function(now, fx) {
        switch (fx.prop) {
        case "top":
            $("div.top").css("height", now);
            $("div.bottom").css("height", now + adjust);    
            break;
        case "left":
            $("div.left").css("width", now);
            $("div.right").css("width", now + adjust);
        }
    },
    complete: function() {
        $(this).parent().addClass("image2");

        $(this).animate({
            top: 0,
            left: 0,
            width: $clip.parent().width(),
            height: $clip.parent().height()
        }, {
            duration: speed,
            step: function(now, fx) {
                switch (fx.prop) {
                case "top":
                    $("div.top").css("height", now);
                    $("div.bottom").css("height", now + adjust);    
                    break;
                case "left":
                    $("div.left").css("width", now);
                    $("div.right").css("width", now + adjust);
                }
            },
            complete: function() {
                $("div.imageContainer > *").removeAttr("style");
            }
        });
    }
});

EDIT:

The CSS3 Solution

When cross-browser compatibility is less of a concern, CSS3 is an option (although I'd probably suggest seeing what can be done with the new HTML5 Canvas for this kind of animation). There are a couple things to note:

  • The image must be inside a container in order to allow us to clip toward its center rather than its top left corner.
  • The border-radius attribute will not clip the child images inside a container. For this reason, the image must become the background-image attribute of the container.
  • jQuery does not currently animate border-radius correctly. You can either replace the current jQuery animate functionality for that attribute or build a custom border-radius animation object to make jQuery more well-behaved. I have opted for the latter. Each corner's border-radius must be animated separately.
  • The animation in or out consists of two separate segments, and as a result the "linear" easing function is probably best used for cleanest results.

The method is commented inline below:

The Markup

<div class="imageContainer image1">
</div>

The CSS

div.imageContainer
{
    background-position: 0px 0px;
    background-repeat: no-repeat;
    width: 300px;
    height: 300px;
    position: absolute;
    top: 0;
    left: 0;
}

div.image1
{
    background-image: url(http://www.mysite.com/images/myFirstImage.png);
}

div.image2
{
    background-image: url(http://www.mysite.com/images/mySecondImage.png);
}

The Script

// Total animation speed in or out will be speed * 1.5
var speed = 600;

// Store a reference to the object to be clipped
var $clip = $("div")

// A function to build a mapping object for border radius parameters
var buildRadiusObj = function(value) {

    // Dimension an option object
    var opts = {};

    // Use specialized Mozilla CSS attributes when needed
    var attributes = $.browser.mozilla ?
        ["-moz-border-radius-topleft",
         "-moz-border-radius-bottomleft",
         "-moz-border-radius-topright",
         "-moz-border-radius-bottomright"] :
        ["border-top-left-radius",
         "border-bottom-left-radius",
         "border-top-right-radius",
         "border-bottom-right-radius"];

    // Build the option object
    $.each(attributes, function(i, key) {
        opts[key] = value;
    });

    // Return the result
    return opts;
}

$clip.animate(buildRadiusObj($clip.width() * 0.5), {    // Animate the border radius until circular
    duration: speed * 0.5,
    easing: "linear"
}).animate({                                            // Resize and reposition the container
    width: 0,
    left: $clip.width() / 2,
    height: 0,
    top: $clip.height() / 2
}, {
    duration: speed,
    easing: "linear",
    step: function(now, fx) {                           // Synch up the background-position
        if (fx.prop == "top") {
            $(this).css("background-position", "-" + $(this).css("top") + " -" + $(this).css("left"));
        }
    },
    complete: function() {                              // Swap the image
        $(this).addClass("image2");
    }
}).animate({                                            // Restore position and size
    width: $clip.width(),
    left: 0,
    height: $clip.height(),
    top: 0
}, {
    duration: speed,
    easing: "linear",
    step: function(now, fx) {                           // Synch the background-position
        if (fx.prop == "top") {
            $(this).css("background-position", "-" + $(this).css("top") + " -" + $(this).css("left"));
        }
    },
    complete: function() {                              // Remove inline styles but reapply border-radius
        $(this).removeAttr("style").css(buildRadiusObj($clip.width() * 0.5));
    }
}).animate(buildRadiusObj(0), {                         // Restore border-radius to block
    duration: speed * 0.5,
    easing: "linear",
    complete: function() {
        $(this).removeAttr("style");                    // Remove inline styles
    }
});

Again, the demo is located here.

share|improve this answer
    
That looks very good, although I'm probably gonna need it to work on a background too. I should have mentioned that, but I didn't know at the time I posted the question. :-/ –  GolezTrol Mar 20 '11 at 10:09
    
But I figured I could maybe put the image in a div with (css3) rounded borders and shrink that div. The background image will be truncated at the border even if it is rounded, right? Then I only need to animate the size and position of that div and the position of the background. In IE and (other) older browsers, it will animate as a square, but I can live with that if it will give me the possibility to use this animation on a background. I'll try to figure out how this animation works and how I can adjust it to my needs. Thanks already for the great amount of effort. –  GolezTrol Mar 20 '11 at 10:14
    
@GolezTrol Well, this probably gets a lot easier if you don't care about cross-browser solutions, for what it's worth. However, in the world of IE7/8... oy... Yeah this'll be a mess without Flash or the like. –  lthibodeaux Mar 20 '11 at 14:01
    
@GolezTrol Just an update for you, simply using CSS3 standards, I've created a working demo for you here. Again, not flawless, but an option. I'll make an edit to explain in the above answer. –  lthibodeaux Mar 20 '11 at 16:06
    
@lthibodeaux: Nicely done, however in Chrome the images are shaking. –  pimvdb Mar 20 '11 at 18:31

I came this across, I hope it is interesting: http://www.netzgesta.de/transm/. The transition circles_out with one circle could do the job I think.

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That looks good, although I haven't been able to get it to work yet. I'll try some more this afternoon. –  GolezTrol Mar 20 '11 at 10:02

Here you go. http://jquery.malsup.com/cycle/ Check out the zoom. Something can be worked out with the circle part.

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Yes, I've found that one, but it's not what I need. I don't want to shrink the image itself, but only the space around it, so an increasingly smaller part of the image becomes visible. –  GolezTrol Mar 20 '11 at 10:01

I tried some more and came up with the idea of using a <canvas> element.

Please see the result at: http://jsfiddle.net/3MG8e/2/.

var cv = $('canvas')[0];
var ctx = cv.getContext('2d');
ctx.fillStyle = 'black';

var int = null;
var t = -1;
var amount = 50;
var time = 1000;
var size = 0;

var im = new Image();
im.src = "http://burzak.com/proj/fxcanvas/docs/images/mario2.png";
im.onload = function() {
    size = im.width;
    int = setInterval(update, time / amount);
}

function update() {
    if(++t >= amount) {
        clearInterval(int);
    }
    ctx.fillRect(0, 0, cv.width, cv.height);
    ctx.beginPath();
    ctx.arc(size/2, size/2,
            size/2 - t * (size/2) / amount,
            0, Math.PI*2,
            false);
    ctx.clip();
    ctx.drawImage(im, 0, 0, size, size);
}
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