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I have come to the point where I need to stop storing my data in a VCL component, and have an "underlying datastructure", as Mr. Rob Kennedy suggested.

First of all, this question is about "how do I make an underlying datastructure". :)

My hierachy consists of 2 levels of nodes.

Right now, I go thru my stuff by looping rootnodes, wherein I loop thru the rootnode's childnodes, to get what I need (Data). I would love to be able to store all my data in a so-called Underlying Datastructure, so that I can easily modify the entries using threads (I suppose I am able to do that?)

However, when looping through my entries (right now), the results are depending on the node's Checkstate - if I am using an underlying data structure, how do I know if my node is checked or not, when its my datastructure I loop thru, and not my nodes?

Let's say I wanted to use 2 levels.

This would be the Parent:

TRoot = Record
  RootName : String;
  RootId : Integer;
  Kids : TList; //(of TKid)
End;

And the kid:

TKid = Record
  KidName : String;
  KidId : Integer;
End;

Thats basically what I do now. Comments state that this is not the best solution, so I am open to suggestions. :)

I hope you understand my question(s). :)

Thanks!

share|improve this question
3  
@Jeff, IMHO, your question is not understandable to anyone which didn't read your previous questions, for what you don't provide links (as a last resort), but it is preferable if you write each question as if it is the only question you posted here. That way the question will be easily answerable by anyone, but most important, it will be understandable for future readers. –  jachguate Mar 19 '11 at 22:39
    
@jach - I am glad that you tell me, will try to find the previous post. :) –  Jeff Mar 19 '11 at 22:48
1  
@Jeff: No offense, but if I have got things right, you are a beginner programmer -- but if you keep learning, you will (in a few years) master programming at a much more sophisticated level. Until then, however, I think it is wise not to try too hard things when there are simpler alternatives. Are you really sure that you cannot use a TListBox? I mean, if you need a more advanced control to display your data, like the Virtual TreeView, you should first have the data in some "underlaying datastructure". –  Andreas Rejbrand Mar 19 '11 at 23:11
1  
This question looks useful: stackoverflow.com/questions/1841621 –  David Heffernan Mar 19 '11 at 23:12
1  
@Jeff, Even when you DO get an working answer, it's not in your best interest, nor in the best interest of the community to immediately accept an answer. Unless the problem's very simple, like, you should wait a day or two to accept an answer: maybe an better answer will show up! This is in fact the kind of question that benefits from multiple answers. For example I saw the question this morning, didn't have the time to deal with it, when I came back I saw the tick mark for an answer that suggests using a database. I hate it when people recommend databases as if they'd be a panacea. –  Cosmin Prund Mar 20 '11 at 17:08

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The data structure you're requesting is very simple, it's so simple I'd recommend using the windows-provided TTreeView: it allows storing the text and an ID straight into the tree's node with no additional work.


Despite my recommendation to use the simpler TTreeView I'm going to provide my take on the data structure problem. First of all I'm going to use classes, not records. In your very short code sample you're mixing records and classes in a very unfrotunate way: When you make a copy of the TRoot record (assigning records makes complete copies, because records are allways treated as "values"), you're not making a "deep copy" of the tree: The complete copy of TRoot will contain the same Kids:TList as the original, because classes, unlike records, are references: you're coping the value of the reference.

An other problem when you have a record with an object field is life cycle management: A record doesn't have an destructor so you'll need an other mechanism to free the owned object (Kids:TList). You could replace the TList with an array of Tkid but then you'll need to be very careful when passing the monster record around, because you might end making deep copies of huge records when you least expect it.

In my opinion the most prudent thing to do is to base the data structure on classes, not records: class instances (objects) are passed around as references, so you can move them around all you want with no problems. You also get built-in life cycle management (the destructor)

The base class would look like this. You'll notice it can be used as either the Root or the Kid, because both Root and Kid share data: The both have a name and an ID:

TNodeClass = class
public
  Name: string;
  ID: Integer;
end;

If this class is used as an Root, it needs a way to store the Kids. I assume you're on Delphi 2010+, so you have generics. This class, complete with a list, looks like this:

type
  TNode = class
  public
    ID: integer;
    Name: string;
    VTNode: PVirtualNode;
    Sub: TObjectList<TNode>;

    constructor Create(aName: string = ''; anID: integer = 0);
    destructor Destroy; override;
  end;

constructor TNode.Create(aName:string; anID: Integer);
begin
  Name := aName;
  ID := anID;

  Sub := TObjectList<TNode>.Create;
end;

destructor TNode.Destroy;
begin
  Sub.Free;
end;

You might not immediately realize this, but this class alone is enough to implement a multi-level tree! Here's some code to fill up the tree with some data:

Root := TNode.Create;

// Create the Contacts leaf
Root.Sub.Add(TNode.Create('Contacts', -1));
// Add some contacts
Root.Sub[0].Sub.Add(TNode.Create('Abraham', 1));
Root.Sub[0].Sub.Add(TNode.Create('Lincoln', 2));

// Create the "Recent Calls" leaf
Root.Sub.Add(TNode.Create('Recent Calls', -1));
// Add some recent calls
Root.Sub[1].Sub.Add(TNode.Create('+00 (000) 00.00.00', 3));
Root.Sub[1].Sub.Add(TNode.Create('+00 (001) 12.34.56', 4));

You need a recursive procedure to fill the virtual tree view using this type:

procedure TForm1.AddNodestoTree(ParentNode: PVirtualNode; Node: TNode);
var SubNode: TNode;
    ThisNode: PVirtualNode;

begin
  ThisNode := VT.AddChild(ParentNode, Node); // This call adds a new TVirtualNode to the VT, and saves "Node" as the payload

  Node.VTNode := ThisNode; // Save the PVirtualNode for future reference. This is only an example,
                           // the same TNode might be registered multiple times in the same VT,
                           // so it would be associated with multiple PVirtualNode's.

  for SubNode in Node.Sub do
    AddNodestoTree(ThisNode, SubNode);
end;

// And start processing like this:
VT.NodeDataSize := SizeOf(Pointer); // Make sure we specify the size of the node's payload.
                                    // A variable holding an object reference in Delphi is actually
                                    // a pointer, so the node needs enough space to hold 1 pointer.
AddNodesToTree(nil, Root);

When using objects, different nodes in your Virtual Tree may have different types of objects associated with them. In our example we're only adding nodes of TNode type, but in the real world you might have nodes of types TContact, TContactCategory, TRecentCall, all in one VT. You'll use the is operator to check the actual type of the object in the VT node like this:

procedure TForm1.VTGetText(Sender: TBaseVirtualTree; Node: PVirtualNode;
  Column: TColumnIndex; TextType: TVSTTextType; var CellText: string);
var PayloadObject:TObject;
    Node: TNode;
    Contact : TContact;      
    ContactCategory : TContactCategory;
begin
  PayloadObject := TObject(VT.GetNodeData(Node)^); // Extract the payload of the node as a TObject so
                                                   // we can check it's type before proceeding.
  if not Assigned(PayloadObject) then
    CellText := 'Bug: Node payload not assigned'
  else if PayloadObject is TNode then
    begin
      Node := TNode(PayloadObject); // We know it's a TNode, assign it to the proper var so we can easily work with it
      CellText := Node.Name;
    end
  else if PayloadObject is TContact then
    begin
      Contact := TContact(PayloadObject);
      CellText := Contact.FirstName + ' ' + Contact.LastName + ' (' + Contact.PhoneNumber + ')';
    end
  else if PayloadObject is TContactCategory then
    begin
      ContactCategory := TContactCategory(PayloadObject);
      CellText := ContactCategory.CategoryName + ' (' + IntToStr(ContactCategory.Contacts.Count) + ' contacts)';
    end
  else
    CellText := 'Bug: don''t know how to extract CellText from ' + PayloadObject.ClassName;
end;

And here's an example why to store VirtualNode pointer to your node instances:

procedure TForm1.ButtonModifyClick(Sender: TObject);
begin
  Root.Sub[0].Sub[0].Name := 'Someone else'; // I'll modify the node itself
  VT.InvalidateNode(Root.Sub[0].Sub[0].VTNode); // and invalidate the tree; when displayed again, it will
                                                // show the updated text.
end;

You know have an working example for a simple tree data structure. You'll need to "grow" this data structure to suite your needs: the possibilities are endless! To give you some ideas, directions to explore:

  • You can turn the Name:string into a virtual method GetText:string;virtual and then create specialized descendants of TNode that override GetText to provide specialized behavior.
  • Create a TNode.AddPath(Path:string; ID:Integer) that allows you to do Root.AddPath('Contacts\Abraham', 1); - that is, a method that automatically creates all intermediary nodes to the final node, to allow easy creation of the tree.
  • Include an PVirtualNode into TNode itself so you can check rather the Node is "checked" in the Virtual Tree. This would be a bridge of the data-GUI separation.
share|improve this answer
    
First of all, thanks for this answer! I will definitely give it a try when I get home. However, I read in the Virtual Treeview documentation, that using records is better than classes? I don't know what I'm supposed to believe, as I am still a newbie at this. –  Jeff Mar 21 '11 at 11:44
    
@Jeff, a record might be better if you store the data in the treview node itself. If you move the data to a distinct data structure you'll be storing a pointer: Why would VT care if you store a pointer to a record or a pointer to an object instance? –  Cosmin Prund Mar 21 '11 at 11:57
    
@Cosmin - I have been reading up about pointers (about.com), but I still don't see exactly how they work, when I read "If you move the data to a distinct data structure you'll be storing a pointer". Also, doesen't records take less memory? –  Jeff Mar 21 '11 at 13:23
1  
@Jeff: A record might take a few bytes less memory when compared with a similar class, but records don't have destructors and are passed around by value, not by reference. I thought I explained that in my answer. In my opinion classes are a better fit for tree data structure. Alternatively you can implement your own tree using pointers and records. –  Cosmin Prund Mar 21 '11 at 13:31
1  
@daemon, TNode is a pointer, so PNode = ^TNode is actually a pointer to a pointer, so they're not both "just pointers". One's a pointer, one's a double-indirected pointer. And it would be the wrong type to use in VTGetText especially if you expect the payload to be TNode OR something else: a better choice would be PObject = ^TObject; –  Cosmin Prund May 10 '11 at 7:45

I asked similar question here. I didn't got any useful answers so I decide to make my own implementation, which you can find here.

EDIT: I'll try to post example how you could use my data structure:

uses
  svCollections.GenericTrees;

Declare your data type:

type
  TMainData = record
    Name: string;
    ID: Integer;
  end;

Declare your main data tree object somewhere in your code:

MyTree: TSVTree<TMainData>;

Create it (and do not forget to free later):

MyTree: TSVTree<TMainData>.Create(False);

Assign your VirtualStringTree to our data structure:

MyTree.VirtualTree := VST;

Then you can init your data tree with some values:

procedure TForm1.BuildStructure(Count: Integer);
var
  i, j: Integer;
  svNode, svNode2: TSVTreeNode<TMainData>;
  Data: TMainData;
begin
  MyTree.BeginUpdate;
  try
    for i := 0 to Count - 1 do
    begin
      Data.Name := Format('Root %D', [i]);
      Data.ID := i;
      svNode := MyTree.AddChild(nil, Data);
      for j:= 0 to 10 - 1 do
      begin
        Data.Name := Format('Child %D', [j]);
        Data.ID := j;
        svNode2 := MyTree.AddChild(svNode, Data);
      end;
    end;
  finally
    MyTree.EndUpdate;
  end;
end;

And set VST events to display your data:

procedure TForm1.vt1InitChildren(Sender: TBaseVirtualTree; Node: PVirtualNode;
  var ChildCount: Cardinal);
var
  svNode: TSVTreeNode<TMainData>;
begin
  svNode := MyTree.GetNode(Sender.GenerateIndex(Node));
  if Assigned(svNode) then
  begin
    ChildCount := svNode.FChildCount;
  end;
end;

procedure TForm1.vt1InitNode(Sender: TBaseVirtualTree; ParentNode,
  Node: PVirtualNode; var InitialStates: TVirtualNodeInitStates);
var
  svNode: TSVTreeNode<TMainData>;
begin
  svNode := MyTree.GetNode(Sender.GenerateIndex(Node));
  if Assigned(svNode) then
  begin
    //if TSVTree<TTestas> is synced with Virtual Treeview and we are building tree by
    // setting RootNodeCount, then we must set svNode.FVirtualNode := Node to
    // have correct node references
    svNode.FVirtualNode := Node;  // Don't Forget!!!!
    if svNode.HasChildren then
    begin
      Include(InitialStates, ivsHasChildren);
    end;
  end;
end;

//display info how you like, I simply get name and ID values
procedure TForm1.vt1GetText(Sender: TBaseVirtualTree; Node: PVirtualNode;
  Column: TColumnIndex; TextType: TVSTTextType; var CellText: string);
var
  svNode: TSVTreeNode<TMainData>;
begin
  svNode := MyTree.GetNode(Sender.GenerateIndex(Node));
  if Assigned(svNode) then
  begin
    CellText := Format('%S ID:%D',[svNode.FValue.Name, svNode.FValue.ID]);
  end;
end;

At this point you work only with your MyTree data structure and all the changes made to it will be reflected in your assigned VST. You then can always save (and load) underlying structure to stream or file. Hope this helps.

share|improve this answer
    
I dont see where I can download it? :) –  Jeff May 7 '11 at 17:44
    
I just tested the difference between using the VT to store the data in, and your SVTreeby adding 1000 roots with 1000 children in each. Turns out that the SVTree uses around 100 megs more than the VT one, and the VT one is about twice as fast. Is it because we are using pointers and not the whole record in the VT? –  Jeff May 7 '11 at 18:35
    
There will be some additional memory usage because TSVTreeNode objects are additionally created while building data structure. Don't know how you tested but building my data structure is a little bit slower because it needs to generate unique node's hash to be able to retrieve it later on VT events. I found it quite well performing in decent tests but if you need adding millions of nodes with huge level of hierarchy you may consider some other methods. –  Linas May 7 '11 at 19:01
    
Yours is very nice and easy to use, and threadsafe aswell I presume? I will be using about 20.000 nodes maybe, however Memory usage is already a problem :P –  Jeff May 7 '11 at 19:44

I believe you will be best served by finding an existing library containing a general tree implementation which you can then re-use to serve your needs.

To give you an idea why, here is some code I wrote to illustrate the most simple operation on the most simple tree structure imaginable.

type
  TNode = class
    Parent: TNode;
    NextSibling: TNode;
    FirstChild: TNode;
  end;

  TTree = class
    Root: TNode;
    function AddNode(Parent: TNode): TNode;
  end;

function TTree.AddNode(Parent: TNode);
var
  Node: TNode;
begin
  Result := TNode.Create;

  Result.Parent := Parent;
  Result.NextSibling := nil;
  Result.FirstChild := nil;

  //this may be the first node in the tree
  if not Assigned(Root) then begin
    Assert(not Assigned(Parent));
    Root := Result;
    exit;
  end;

  //this may be the first child of this parent
  if Assigned(Parent) and not Assigned(Parent.FirstChild) then begin
    Parent.FirstChild := Result;
  end;

  //find the previous sibling and assign its next sibling to the new node
  if Assigned(Parent) then begin
    Node := Parent.FirstChild;
  end else begin
    Node := Root;
  end;
  if Assigned(Node) then begin
    while Assigned(Node.NextSibling) do begin
      Node := Node.NextSibling;
    end;
    Node.NextSibling := Result;
  end;
end;

Note: I have not tested this code and so cannot vouch for its correctness. I expect it has defects.

All this does is add an new node to the tree. It gives you little control over where in the tree the node is added. If simply adds a new node as the last sibling of a specified parent node.

To take this sort of approach you would likely need to deal with:

  • Inserting after a specified sibling. Actually this is quite a simple variant of the above.
  • Removing a node. This is somewhat more complex.
  • Moving existing nodes within the tree.
  • Walking the tree.
  • Connecting the tree to your VST.

It's certainly feasible to do this, but you may be better advised to find a 3rd party library that already implements the functionality.

share|improve this answer

If I understand correctly, you need a datastructure for your tree. Each individual node requires a record to hold its data. But the underlying heirarchy can be managed in a few different ways. Im guessing this is all to be managed in some sort of database - This has already been talked about on this site, so i will point you to:

Implementing a hierarchical data structure in a database

and here:

What is the most efficient/elegant way to parse a flat table into a tree?

and here:

SQL - how to store and navigate hierarchies

Nested Set Model:

http://mikehillyer.com/articles/managing-hierarchical-data-in-mysql/

share|improve this answer
4  
The question has nothing to do with databases or flat files. –  Ken White Mar 20 '11 at 0:39
    
It is a bit ambiguous - but he can see the principal of storing a tree structure in (some table/matrix/array etc) with these links. –  Simon Mar 20 '11 at 0:51
    
-1 because a database is not a data structure. –  Cosmin Prund Mar 20 '11 at 15:19

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