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Is it normal to only have a broadcast intent with action NETWORK_STATE_CHANGED_ACTION (whose constant value is android.net.wifi.STATE_CHANGE) when a Wifi connection is coming back up? I.e. I don't get this intent when Wifi is being disconnected.

UPDATE: I am mostly interested to >= 2.2 Froyo

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I had the same problems for weeks and I think it's normal (or a bug ;)). I know this doesn't help, but just for information... –  RoflcoptrException Mar 21 '11 at 23:46
2  
Just to clarify for future readers: that intent is for the state (disabled, enabling, enabled, disabling) of the wifi transceiver, basically telling you if wifi is on or off. You were looking for the state of connectivity, which is different. –  JeffE Nov 4 '11 at 21:42
    
@JeffE: nope - "android.net.wifi.STATE_CHANGE" corresponds to NETWORK_STATE_CHANGED_ACTION which is for net connectivity. WIFI_STATE_CHANGED_ACTION is for enable, disable etc - corresponds to "android.net.wifi.WIFI_STATE_CHANGED" Please delete your confusing comment. To the OP - I think the answer by M Granja is the correct one –  Mr_and_Mrs_D Nov 13 '13 at 23:22

2 Answers 2

up vote 19 down vote accepted
+50

public static final String SUPPLICANT_CONNECTION_CHANGE_ACTION

Since: API Level 1

Broadcast intent action indicating that a connection to the supplicant has been established (and it is now possible to perform Wi-Fi operations) or the connection to the supplicant has been lost. One extra provides the connection state as a boolean, where true means CONNECTED.

See Also

EXTRA_SUPPLICANT_CONNECTED

Constant Value: "android.net.wifi.supplicant.CONNECTION_CHANGE"

In android's API it says that it's not a good idea to check STATE_CHANGE for network connectivity and instead you should use SUPPLICANT_CONNECTION_CHANGE_ACTION. this will notice an establishment to a wifi network, and the disconnection of a wifi network. I don't know if this might help you, but I do hope so. LINK

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I get a connection change event on "disconnect" now! Thanks! –  jldupont Mar 22 '11 at 0:27
1  
I'm glad it worked out! Good luck with your project mate! –  rsplak Mar 26 '11 at 15:50

I had a similar need in my project and ended up having to use both.

The android.net.wifi.supplicant.CONNECTION_CHANGE action sends a broadcast when the network is connected, but usually before the device has an IP address, so I needed the android.net.wifi.STATE_CHANGE action for that.

The android.net.wifi.STATE_CHANGE action receives a broadcast on disconnect only if the device is disconnecting from a network, but wifi is still enabled (when hotspot goes out of range, for example)

So you should put both actions for the receiver in the manifest:

<receiver android:name="net.moronigranja.tproxy.WifiReceiver">
            <intent-filter>
                    <action android:name="android.net.wifi.STATE_CHANGE"/>
                    <action android:name="android.net.wifi.supplicant.CONNECTION_CHANGE" />
            </intent-filter>
</receiver>

and you put an if to check which action is being called in the intent. Here is the onReceive method of the BroadcastReceiver in my code:

public void onReceive(Context c, Intent intent) {
      if(intent.getAction().equals(WifiManager.SUPPLICANT_CONNECTION_CHANGE_ACTION)){ 
          boolean connected = intent.getBooleanExtra(WifiManager.EXTRA_SUPPLICANT_CONNECTED, false);
          if(!connected) {
               //Start service for disconnected state here
          }
      }

      else if(intent.getAction().equals(WifiManager.NETWORK_STATE_CHANGED_ACTION)){
          NetworkInfo netInfo = intent.getParcelableExtra(WifiManager.EXTRA_NETWORK_INFO);
          if( netInfo.isConnected() )
          {
              //Start service for connected state here.
          }   
      }
  }
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even though i used a separate class for my broadcast receiver, checking the supplicant was the key to solving my problem. –  tony gil Jul 20 '12 at 17:58

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