Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have written the following code in C#. I have looked at it in every way and I think it should work but it isn't giving any output even though I let it running overnight. What is the issue? Thanks in advance.

namespace Palymdrome
{
    class Multiple
    {
        private int x;
        private int y;

        public int ProductY
        {
            get
            {
                return y;
            }

            set
            {
                y = value;
            }


        }
        public int ProductX
        {
            get
            {
                return x;
            }
            set
            {
                x = value;
            }
        }
        public int Value
        {
            get
            {
                return x * y;
            }
        }

        public Multiple(int x, int y)
        {
            this.x = x;
            this.y = y;
        }
    }


    class Program
    {
        static bool IsPalimdrome(int palimdrome)
        {
            string sPalimdrome = palimdrome.ToString();
            int decrescent = sPalimdrome.Length-1;
            string sInverted = "";
            for (decrescent=sPalimdrome.Length-1;decrescent>=0;decrescent--)
            {
                sInverted += sPalimdrome[decrescent];
            }

            if (sPalimdrome == sInverted)
            {
                return true;
            }

            return false;
        }

        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            Multiple multiple = new Multiple(999, 999);
            int[] values = new int[999999];
            int i = 0;

            while (multiple.ProductY > 0)
            {
                multiple.ProductX--;
                if (multiple.ProductX == 0)
                {
                    multiple.ProductY--;
                    multiple.ProductX = 999;
                }

                if (IsPalimdrome(multiple.Value) && multiple.Value != 0)
                {
                    values[i] = multiple.Value;
                    i++;
                }

                /*if (multiple.ProductY < 10)
                {
                    Console.WriteLine("100 reached, waiting for confirmation");
                    Console.Read();
                }*/



            }

            Console.WriteLine(values.Max());
            Console.Read();


        }
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
When you run under a debugger and break into the program while running, where is it usually executing? What values do your variables have? –  Gabe Mar 20 '11 at 0:51
    
Instead of detecting X == 0 and adjusting Y manually, it would be much cleaner to use nested for loops. Since you can assume X <= Y without loss of generality: for( multiple.ProductY = 999; multiple.ProductY > 99; multiple.ProductY-- ) for (multiple.ProductX = multiple.ProductY; multiple.ProductX > 99; multiple.ProductX-- ) { ... } –  Ben Voigt Mar 20 '11 at 0:54
    
@Ben: He's looking for a product of 3-digit numbers, so it would suffice to make the condition multiple.ProductY >= 100 (and same for X). –  Gabe Mar 20 '11 at 0:57
    
@Gabe: Quite correct. Ninja'd. –  Ben Voigt Mar 20 '11 at 0:59

4 Answers 4

I didn't follow the code all the way to see exactly why it doesn't work, but man oh man are you making things complicated.

For one, implementing IsPalindrome is trivial with LINQ:

static bool IsPalindrome(int number)
{
    var s = number.ToString();
    return s.Reverse().SequenceEqual(s);
}

Also, when looping you certainly don't need to take into account values of x and y less than 100 because the product would not be the product of two 3-digit numbers by definition. Moreover, you don't need to check both x * y and y * x for any fixed values of x, y because again the product will be identical. This means that for any one value of x you can disregard all values of y that are less than x.

Finally, you don't need to allocate an array with 999999 elements. A List<int> will do just fine.

So, you can simply do:

var results = new List<int>();

for(var x = 100; x < 1000; ++x) {
    for(var y = x; y < 1000; ++y) {
        if (IsPalindrome(x * y)) {
            results.Add(x*y);
        }
    }
}

And if we go all in for LINQ:

var result = 
    Enumerable.Range(100, 900).
    SelectMany(x => Enumerable.Range(x, 1000 - x).Select(y => x * y)).
    Where(IsPalindrome).
    Max();
share|improve this answer
    
The assignment calls for .Max() rather than .ToList(). –  Gabe Mar 20 '11 at 1:05
    
@Gabe: Fixed. He was calling Max at the end manually in his own code, so I mentally left that as a necessary last step. –  Jon Mar 20 '11 at 1:06
    
You also don't need the tuple. Just (from x in Enumerable.Range(100, 900) from y in Enumerable.Range(x, 1000 - x) where IsPalindrome(x * y) select x * y).Max() would work. Or Enumerable.Range(100, 900).SelectMany(x => Enumerable.Range(x, 1000 - x).Select(y => x * y)).Where(t => IsPalindrome(t)).Max() –  Gabe Mar 20 '11 at 1:18
    
@Gabe: Thanks for pointing that out as well. No excuses this time :) –  Jon Mar 20 '11 at 1:20
1  
@Jon: The nice thing about the LINQ, of course, is that it doesn't store all palindromes, just the greatest one found so far. –  Ben Voigt Mar 20 '11 at 1:41

Your program works fine for me and spits out the number 906609 - which is the correct solution to the Project Euler Problem 4 that you are referring to. Could it be that you just had a breakpoint left somewhere and program execution was paused?

share|improve this answer

I'm going to guess that the algorithm is completing but the program isn't finishing because you forgot that you have to press Enter to exit.

share|improve this answer

A possibly-faster way of doing this is to look at the possible range of "multiple of 3-digit numbers" (it is the closed range from 100*100 to 999*999) and generate all palindromic numbers in this range (loop from 999 down to 100, for each three-digit number abc, generate abccba; factor this and see if you can generate two 3-digit numbers from the prime factors, if you can't loop over teh same range and generate abcba).

The difference here is that you try to map from possible answers to possible precursors, in a way that allows you to finish as soon as you can possibly find an answer. The flip side is that factorisation isn't entirely cheap (but, then, it's all pretty small numbers and you can simply generate a list of all primes less than 1000 for your trialling, as any palindrome with a prime factor larger than 999 will not be a product of two three-digit numbers).

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.