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From the PHP manual:

class Bear {
// define properties
public $name;
public $weight;
public $age;
public $sex;
public $colour;

// constructor
public function __construct() {
    $this->age = 0;
    $this->weight = 100;
}

I'm interested in what would happen in terms of objects and classes if the line: $this->age = 0; was changed to $age = 0; what exact effect does this change have?

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You likely mean $age = 0;, not age = 0;. –  icktoofay Mar 20 '11 at 1:25
    
@icktoofay - thats what 1.26am will do to a man –  benhowdle89 Mar 20 '11 at 1:26

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You will assign 0 to local variable age. Since it doesn't exist, it will be initialized. Once the constructor goes out of scope, age will be forgotten. The class member age will not be changed.

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The class variable "age" would be unaffected by the change. Here's a good example as to why this is the case:

class Bear {
    // define properties
    public $name;
    public $weight;
    public $age;
    public $sex;
    public $colour;

    // constructor
    public function __construct($age) {
        $age = $age * 2; // Convert to bear years.
        $this->age = $age;
        $this->weight = 100;
    }
}

Now when we create the bear, we have the option to set the age via the constructor:

$ben = new Bear(8);

We can also modify the bear's age in much the same way as we did within the constructor:

$ben->age = 12;

This gives the variable a scope. Ben's age is specific to him. It's a local variable.

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