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I'm just not sure how to mock up a situation to test this. Should I actually create a file on the file system?

public static void DeleteIfExists(this FileInfo fileInfo)
{
   if (fileInfo.Exists)
   {
      fileInfo.Delete();
   }
}
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It could fail if somebody changes the implementation and breaks it. :-) –  Mike Cole Mar 20 '11 at 2:49
    
I would create a file. Just like when I test db, I first insert a new record so I have a dummy to test the delete method... –  BrunoLM Mar 20 '11 at 2:56
    
@BrunoLM - Why would you do this instead of using RhinoMocks? –  Mike Cole Mar 20 '11 at 3:00
1  
is this an example of trying to write a unit test, when it is really an Integration test? –  Mitch Wheat Mar 20 '11 at 3:02
1  
Get rid of the extension method and just call FileInfo.Delete. If the file does not exist, FileInfo.Delete does nothing. See msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.io.fileinfo.delete.aspx –  TrueWill Mar 20 '11 at 3:34

1 Answer 1

up vote 8 down vote accepted

I'd use a mocking framework, like RhinoMocks.

[Test]
public void ShouldDeleteAFileWhenItExists()
{
    var mockInfo = MockRepository.GenerateMock<FileInfo>();
    mockInfo.Expect( i => i.Exists ).Return( true ).Repeat.Once();
    mockInfo.Expect( i => i.Delete() ).Repeat.Once();

    var extensions = new FileInfoExtensions();

    extensions.DeleteIfExists( mockInfo );

    mockInfo.VerifyAllExpectations();
}

[Test]
public void ShouldNotDeleteAFileWhenItDoesNotExist()
{
    var mockInfo = MockRepository.GenerateMock<FileInfo>();
    mockInfo.Expect( i => i.Exists ).Return( false ).Repeat.Once();
    mockInfo.Expect( i => i.Delete() ).Repeat.Never();

    var extensions = new FileInfoExtensions();

    extensions.DeleteIfExists( mockInfo );

    mockInfo.VerifyAllExpectations();
}

Other tests for when Delete throws an exception, etc.

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1  
while that works, it exposes the internal logic of the method under test: the contract with the outside world is "Delete a file if it exists", but we are not constrained by how we achieve that.... what if an implemenation calls Exists() twice? Those tests enforce that the method has been implmented a certain way, which seems wrong to me... –  Mitch Wheat Mar 20 '11 at 3:01
1  
My point is, those tests enforce a particular implementation. –  Mitch Wheat Mar 20 '11 at 3:06
1  
Testing whether the Delete member was called feels wrong. What if the method was changed to get the full path of the file and then just called File.Delete(path)? Surely, this is a correct implementation... –  Tomas Petricek Mar 20 '11 at 3:15
1  
@tvanfosson: I think this is an abuse of testing. A test should not rely on a specific internal implementation. –  Mitch Wheat Mar 20 '11 at 3:16
2  
@Mitch - it's an extension method! we're not trying to invent a new way of deleting a file, we're trying to reduce a bit of code replication for a pattern that checks to see if a file exists before we delete it using an object of the class we're extending. In this case it is the specific invocation of the methods we care about, not whether a file actually gets deleted. We trust that the class we're extending works. –  tvanfosson Mar 20 '11 at 3:20

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