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I'm loading a iframe with $.ajax():

$("#iframe_wrapper").each(function(){
  $.ajax({
    type: "post",
    url: "http://site.com",
    data: { action: 'get_the_iframe' },
    context: this,
    success: function(html){
      $(this).html(html);
      $(this).show();
      $('#theiframe').load(function(){
        // do stuff with the iframe...
      });
    }
  });
});

the iframe is inside a function that gets called if $_POST['action'] is 'get_the_iframe':

<iframe id="theiframe" name="theiframe" src="http://site.com/page/"></iframe>

it works, but the problem is that the browser seems to display the entire page really slow, it seems like it waits for the iframe to load before displaying the entire content on the page, which is not supposed to happen because it's done trough ajax. This is exactly what I was trying to avoid...

Any ideas what's wrong here?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I think the key to the answer is where, or more specifically, when your jQuery fragment that performs the ajax post is being run by the browser.

I suspect the jQuery code to load the page happens sometime before the full page has loaded. And maybe your browser doesn't support asynchronous loads from the same domain.. This was the case with IE for a long time. So what's going on is the browser starts loading and processing the iframe somewhat in-step with the rest of the requests that your normal (outer) page is doing.

If this is not the case yet try putting the code that starts the ajax post in a document ready handler. Also, check in other browsers to see if the problem occurs across the board.

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The reason why you are seeing this is because IFrame is blocking element, especially in IE. IFrames are the most costly element to create in a browser, and it also will block execution of JavaScript when it's being created. There's also resource blocking rule regarding IFrame as well. If you have CSS files in your page, IFrame will not load until response for each and every CSS file is received by the browser (IE) or in Firefox, all IFrame's resources will be blocked until response is received for all resources on the main page.

Just as an example, I had a standard spinner control, that would display running snake whenever I do AJAX call to the server (to give user some feedback that something is happening). I also was create IFrame element at the body level, to overlay all dropdown elements on the page for IE6/7 bleed through bug. At some point I noticed that my web-service calls where about twice slower in IE then they were in FF. After some investigation, I realized that creation of the IFrame element is blocking everything in the browser, including code that receives response from the server.

I don't think there's a way around it, except for not using IFrames...

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