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I'm try to build a static property on a static class that will basically return a cookie value, to be used across my MVC site (MVC 3, if it matters). Something like this:

public static class SharedData
{
    public static string SomeValue
    {
        get
        {
            if (HttpContext.Current.Request.Cookies["SomeValue"] == null)
            {
                CreateNewSomeValue();
            }

            return HttpContext.Current.Request.Cookies["SomeValue"].Value.ToString();
        }
    }
}

I need to access this from within controller actions, global.asax methods, and action filters. But the problem is, when action filters run, HttpContext is not available. Right now, I have to have a separate static method just to pull the cookie from the filter context that I pass in, which seems awkward.

What is the best solution for building such a static method for retrieving a cookie value like this that works from both controller actions and action filters? Or is there a better approach for doing something like this?

Thanks in advance.

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1  
HttpContext.Current should be available when action filters run. What error are you getting? –  Johnny Oshika Mar 20 '11 at 4:11
    
Wow, you're right. I have no idea why I thought it wasn't. Maybe it wasn't for a different action filter, or on the "Executed" instead of "Executing"? I don't know, but I could have sworn that it was null at some point when I was working on this. Thanks! –  Jerad Rose Mar 20 '11 at 4:15

2 Answers 2

The call to the static HttpContext.Current is not good design. Instead, create an extension method to access the cookie from an instance of HttpContext and HttpContextBase.

I wrote a little helper for you. You can use it to perform your functionality from within an action filter.

public static class CookieHelper
{
    private const string SomeValue = "SomeValue";
    public static string get_SomeValue(this HttpContextBase httpContext)
    {
        if(httpContext.Request.Cookies[SomeValue]==null)
        {
            string value = CreateNewSomeValue();
            httpContext.set_SomeValue(value);
            return value;
        }
        return httpContext.Request.Cookies[SomeValue].Value;
    }
    public static void set_SomeValue(this HttpContextBase httpContext, string value)
    {
        var someValueCookie = new HttpCookie(SomeValue, value);
        if (httpContext.Request.Cookies.AllKeys.Contains(SR.session))
        {
            httpContext.Response.Cookies.Set(someValueCookie);
        }
        else
        {
            httpContext.Response.Cookies.Add(someValueCookie);
        }
    }   
}

Note: You could easily make these methods work on HttpContext instead just by replacing the HttpContextBase parameter with HttpContext.

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Thanks for your response. A couple questions though. From what I've read, if you want to make your MVC app easily testable, you need to remove dependencies from HttpContext as much as possible. By littering your app with references to HttpContext or filterContext.HttpContext, isn't that worse? Also, it seems silly to have to have two methods that do the exact same thing, just because HttpContext doesn't derive from HttpContextBase (which is what filterContext.HttpContext is). I'm trying to avoid that as well. Thanks again. –  Jerad Rose Mar 20 '11 at 4:09
    
(1) To make your app testable, remove references to HttpContext. HttpContextBase, on the other hand, is completely testable. Even though the property is called HttpContext, it returns an HttpContextBase object. (2) Yes, it is silly to have two methods that do the exact same thing. What two methods do the exact same thing? If you mean to make extension methods on HttpContext or HttpContextBase, then I wasn't suggesting you do that, only letting you know that you could and how you could. –  smartcaveman Mar 20 '11 at 4:22
    
Also, it's possible that you could have to work with an application which has a dependency on HttpContext instead of HttpContextBase, and while you could just new HttpContextWrapper(context).get_SomeValue(), it would be more efficient to just have an extension method on the HttpContext instance. –  smartcaveman Mar 20 '11 at 4:24
up vote 0 down vote accepted

As JohnnyO pointed out above, I had access to HttpContext from within my action filter all along. At least, in the particular action filter method where this was needed. There may have been some other filter/method that did not have access at one point, but for now, this is working as I need it to.

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