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The ancient Egyptians only used fractions of the form 1/n so any other fraction had to be represented as a sum of such unit fractions and, furthermore, all the unit fractions were different!

What is a good method to make any fraction an egyptian fraction (the less sums better) in C or java, what algorithm can be used, branch and bound, a*?

for example:

3/4 = 1/2 + 1/4

6/7 = 1/2 + 1/3 + 1/42 
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2  
Why is this tagged "artificial-intelligence"? –  Gabe Mar 20 '11 at 5:52
    
More of a math / number theory question. See mathworld.wolfram.com/EgyptianFraction.html for lots of links. –  Vance Maverick Mar 20 '11 at 5:56
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@In silico why did you remove math tag, which I add?? Actually this is a mathematical question. –  UmmaGumma Mar 20 '11 at 5:59
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What do you mean by "good method"? Easy to implement? Shortest length expansion? Quickest to execute? Something else? –  Ted Hopp Mar 20 '11 at 6:05
    
any algorithm that has some features as you said, Quickest to execute is a very nice one –  cMinor Mar 20 '11 at 6:08

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

One way is the greedy algorithm. Given the fraction f, find the largest Egyptian fraction 1/n less than or equal to f (i.e., n = ceil(1/f)). Then repeat for the remainder f - 1/n, until f == 0.

So for 3/4, you'd compute:

  • n = ceil(4/3) = 2; remainder = 3/4 - 1/2 = 1/4
  • n = ceil(4) = 4; remainder = 1/4 - 1/4 = 0
  • 3/4 = 1/2 + 1/4

And for 6/7:

  • n = ceil(7/6) = 2; remainder = 6/7 - 1/2 = 5/14
  • n = ceil(14/5) = 3; remainder = 5/14 - 1/3 = 1/42
  • n = ceil(42) = 42; remainder = 1/42 - 1/42 = 0
  • 6/7 = 1/2 + 1/3 + 1/42
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Cropped from Egyptian Fractions

How did I come up with these values? Well, I estimated the fraction with the largest unit fraction that was just smaller than the given fraction. I subtracted this unit fraction from the given fraction. If this remainder was still not a unit fraction, I repeated the process, choosing the largest unit fraction that is smaller than this remainder. And the process could be repeated over and over.

Let's use 7/8 as an example. We estimate 7/8 with 2/3 (the largest unit fraction less than 7/8). We subtract 7/8 - 2/3, which is 5/24, which cannot be simplified into a unit fraction. So we estimate 5/24 with 1/5 (the largest unit fraction less than 5/24). We subtract 5/24-1/5, and we get 1/120, which is a unit fraction. So, 7/8=2/3 + 1/5 + 1/120.

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@quasiverse: It's not, but the Egyptians had special symbols for 2/3 and 3/4 instead of being required to write 1/2+1/6 or 1/2+1/4. –  dan04 Mar 20 '11 at 6:08
    
+1 For the "layman" explanation extract :p –  user166390 Mar 20 '11 at 6:13
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Taking @dano04's comment that 2/3 and 3/4 were given special treatment, the second paragraph of the explanation is puzzling to me. Why isn't 3/4 a better starting point than 2/3? 7/8 = 1/2 + 1/4 + 1/8 looks simpler to me than 7/8 = 1/2 + 1/6 + 1/5 + 1/120 (aka: 7/8 = 1/2 + 1/5 + 1/6 + 1/120). One reason might be that the reference didn't recognize 3/4 as having special treatment; I'm not sure whether there are any others. –  Jonathan Leffler Apr 16 '11 at 22:27

For a / b, make MAX a * b.

Take the prime factors of MAX (which is the union of prime_fac(a) and prime_fac(b) and the multiples one each from those two lists) and iterate through them, starting low and going high.

Those are your possible 1/x's.

Edit: Oh yeah! Don't forget to take into consideration 2/3!

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And how would it work for 6/7, where prime factors are 2, 3 and 7? –  AndreyT Mar 20 '11 at 6:04
    
@Andrey Prime factors are all prime factors of 42. I shouldn't have used the word "union" in there without further clarification. –  corsiKa Mar 20 '11 at 6:05

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