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Consider this minimal example:

include <iostream>

struct foo
{
      foo &operator=(const foo &)
      {
              std::cout << "base copy assignment\n";
              return *this;
      }
      foo &operator=(foo &&)
      {
              std::cout << "base move assignment\n";
              return *this;
      }
};

struct bar: foo
{
      template <typename T>
      bar &operator=(T &&x)
      {
              std::cout << "derived generic assignment\n";
              foo::operator=(std::forward<T>(x));
              return *this;
      }
};

int main()
{
    bar b, c;
    b = c;
    b = bar{};
}

The output of this program is:

derived generic assignment
base copy assignment
base move assignment

whereas I would expect it to be:

derived generic assignment
base copy assignment
derived generic assignment
base move assignment

Or, in other words, it seems like the perfect forwarding of operator=() in bar is not kicking in case of move assignment: the base move assignment operator is called instead.

I've tried the same test with a simple member function and in that case the result is as I would expect (i.e., the perfectly-forwarded assignment in bar is always called before any of the base assignments). Also, with GCC 4.5 as opposed to the 4.6 pre-release I'm currently using, the behaviour is also as I would expect.

Is this an intended behaviour specific to assignment operators or is this a recent GCC bug?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I at first answered incorrectly. I believe the output you are getting is correct. There is an implicit generation of a move assignment operator in bar, and that is what is getting called in your second assignment. The implicit move assignment operator is a better match than your explicit generic one.

There is also an implicit copy assignment operator, but in this case the generic assignment operator is a better match because c is not const.

Elaboration:

The generation of an implicit move assignment operator is only inhibited if the user declares a copy assignment operator, move assignment operator, copy constructor, move constructor or destructor. None of these special members can be a template. [class.copy] enumerates the forms for each of these special members.

For example a move assignment operator for class X will have one of the following forms:

operator=(X&&);
operator=(const X&&);
operator=(volatile X&&);
operator=(const volatile X&&);

(any return type can be used).

The templated assignment operator in bar does not qualify as a special member. It is not a copy assignment operator nor a move assignment operator.

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1  
I thought defining an assignment operator stopped the implicit generation of assignment operators? –  Clinton Mar 20 '11 at 14:33
    
Your comment is a good one. I've elaborated my answer in an attempt to address your comment. I was just going to add the elaboration as a comment, but formatting concerns drove me to edit the answer instead. –  Howard Hinnant Mar 20 '11 at 15:27
    
Thank you very much for the explanation and the references, I'm marking the answer as accepted. –  bluescarni Mar 20 '11 at 18:52
    
Out of curiosity, which constructors are considered special member functions? The sentence at the beginning of clause 12 ("Special member functions") states that the default, copy, and move constructors are "special member functions," but the fact that the constructors specification is in 12.1 might imply that all constructors are "special." –  James McNellis Mar 21 '11 at 14:45
    
@James: [special]/p1 defines "special member functions". –  Howard Hinnant Mar 23 '11 at 21:49

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