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I was wondering if it is possible to disable the Required validation attribute in certain controller actions. I am wondering this because on one of my edit forms I do not require the user to enter values for fields that they have already specified previously. However I then implement logic that when they enter a value it uses some special logic to update the model, such as hashing a value etc.

Any sugestions on how to get around this problem?

EDIT:
And yes client validation is a problem here to, as it will not allow them to submit the form without entering a value.

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2  
+1 good Q. Would be good to mention client validation here. One option is to remove the RequiredAttr completely and do a server side check when you need to. But this would be tricky on the client –  gideon Mar 20 '11 at 7:45
3  
Points for anyone who also covers disabling certain fields from client validation (no removing the references to jquery validation) –  gideon Mar 20 '11 at 7:46
    
Maybe i'm missing your point, but if the user has already specified the values beforehand, then those values are already present, and thus will pass Required validation. Did you mean something else? –  Erik Funkenbusch Mar 20 '11 at 8:11
    
Because these values have since been hashed, such as password and security answer, so if they enter a new value on the edit form I want to re-hash the new value before insertion, but i also want the option for it to be left blank sort of thing. –  Alex Hope O'Connor Mar 21 '11 at 2:52
1  
@gideon: see Adrian Smith's answer: stackoverflow.com/a/9781066/114029 –  Leniel Macaferi Apr 15 '12 at 15:56

10 Answers 10

up vote 41 down vote accepted

This problem can be easily solved by using view models. View models are classes that are specifically tailored to the needs of a given view. So for example in your case you could have the following view models:

public UpdateViewView
{
    [Required]
    public string Id { get; set; }

    ... some other properties
}

public class InsertViewModel
{
    public string Id { get; set; }

    ... some other properties
}

which will be used in their corresponding controller actions:

[HttpPost]
public ActionResult Update(UpdateViewView model)
{
    ...
}

[HttpPost]
public ActionResult Insert(InsertViewModel model)
{
    ...
}
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Not always true if you have a boolean/bit that is not nullable. But really doesn't make a difference since its going to end up true or false. I had css to highlight required fields and it falsely highlighted the CheckBoxFor item. My solution: $("#IsValueTrue").removeAttr("data-val-required"); –  rob Apr 25 '12 at 18:01
    
In update we generally have (FormCollection collection). could you please explain how you are using model as parameter –  Raj Kumar Jun 7 '12 at 16:14
2  
No, we don't usually have Update(FormCollection collection), at least I never do. I always define and use a specific view model: Update(UpdateViewView model). –  Darin Dimitrov Jun 7 '12 at 17:23
    
Overloading methods with the same HTTP action are not allowed, so to me it seems like this would not work. Am I missing something? –  edgi Dec 3 '12 at 21:48
    
@edgi, no, you are not missing anything. It's a mistake in my post. The second action method should obviously be called Insert. Thanks for pointing this out. –  Darin Dimitrov Dec 4 '12 at 6:42

If you just want to disable validation for a single field in client side then you can override the validation attributes as follows:

@Html.TexBoxFor(model => model.SomeValue, 
                new Dictionary<string, object> { { "data-val", false }})
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7  
What worked for me via jQuery: $("#SomeValue").removeAttr("data-val-required"); –  rob Apr 25 '12 at 17:58
1  
I like this approach but I needed to re-parse the form validation attributes using: $('form').removeData('unobtrusiveValidation'); $('form').removeData('validator'); $.validator.unobtrusive.parse('selector for your form'); –  Yannick Smits May 7 '12 at 14:59
7  
@Html.TexBoxFor(model => model.SomeValue, new { data_val = false }) - easier to read IMO. –  eth0 May 16 '12 at 11:04
    
I liked most of this approach to leave me give a fine control of each field, but you could add to cancel ModelState.IsValid when send data to save by POST. Maybe cause some risk ? –  Felipe FMMobile Sep 6 '12 at 16:38
1  
If you want to disable it through jQuery: $(".search select").attr('data-val', false); –  Leniel Macaferi Jun 19 '13 at 0:42

Personally I would tend to use the approach Darin Dimitrov showed in his solution. This frees you up to be able to use the data annotation approach with validation AND have separate data attributes on each ViewModel corresponding to the task at hand. To minimize the amount of work for copying between model and viewmodel you should look at AutoMapper or ValueInjecter. Both have their individual strong points, so check them both.

Another possible approach for you would be to derive your viewmodel or model from IValidatableObject. This gives you the option to implement a function Validate. In validate you can return either a List of ValidationResult elements or issue a yield return for each problem you detect in validation.

The ValidationResult consists of an error message and a list of strings with the fieldnames. The error messages will be shown at a location near the input field(s).

public IEnumerable<ValidationResult> Validate(ValidationContext validationContext)
{
  if( NumberField < 0 )
  {
    yield return new ValidationResult( 
        "Don't input a negative number", 
        new[] { "NumberField" } );
  }

  if( NumberField > 100 )
  {
    yield return new ValidationResult( 
        "Don't input a number > 100", 
        new[] { "NumberField" } );
  }

  yield break;
}
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can we hook this on client side? –  Muhammad Adeel Zahid Mar 20 '11 at 19:05
    
client-side validation generally is done for individual fields only, performing interactive, field-by-field validation feedback, as a convenience to the user. Since the object-validation step generally involves dependent validation (multiple fields and/or conditions that are external to the object itself) this can't necessarily be performed on the client-side, even if you could compile the code to JavaScript. If complex/dependent validation on the client-side does add value in your case, you will need to use the onsubmit-callback and duplicate the validation logic on the client-side. –  mindplay.dk Mar 29 '12 at 14:47

I know this question has been answered a long time ago and the accepted answer will actually do the work. But there's one thing that bothers me: having to copy 2 models only to disable a validation.

Here's my suggestion:

public class InsertModel
{
    [Display(...)]
    public virtual string ID { get; set; }

    ...Other properties
}

public class UpdateModel : InsertModel
{
    [Required]
    public override string ID
    {
        get { return base.ID; }
        set { base.ID = value; }
    }
}

This way, you don't have to bother with client/server side validations, the framework will behave the way it's supposed to. Also, if you define a [Display] attribute on the base class, you don't have to redefine it in your UpdateModel.

And you can still use these classes the same way:

[HttpPost]
public ActionResult Update(UpdateModel model)
{
    ...
}

[HttpPost]
public ActionResult Insert(InsertModel model)
{
    ...
}
share|improve this answer
    
I like this approach better, especially if you have a long list of validation attributes. In your example, you can add more attributes in the base class to have the benefit more apparent. The only disadvantage I can see is that there is no way for inheriting properties to override the attributes. Example, if you have a [Required] property on the base class, the inheriting property is forced to be [Required] also, unless you have a custom [Optional] attribute. –  Yorro Dec 16 '13 at 6:18
    
I thought of something like this too, although I have a viewModel that has an object 'Project' that has multiple attributes and i only want one of these attributes validated under certain circumstances. I dont think i can just override a attribute of an object right? any advice? –  vincent de g Oct 6 at 22:24
    
You can't override the attribute. The base class should only contain common attributes for all sub classes. Then, your sub classes should define the attributes they need. –  PhilDulac Oct 7 at 11:32

Client side For disabling validation for a form, multiple options based on my research is given below. One of them would would hopefully work for you.

Option 1

I prefer this, and this works perfectly for me.

(function ($) {
    $.fn.turnOffValidation = function (form) {
        var settings = form.validate().settings;

        for (var ruleIndex in settings.rules) {
            delete settings.rules[ruleIndex];
        }
    };
})(jQuery); 

and invoking it like

$('#btn').click(function () {
    $(this).turnOffValidation(jQuery('#myForm'));
});

Option 2

$('your selector here').data('val', false);
$("form").removeData("validator");
$("form").removeData("unobtrusiveValidation");
$.validator.unobtrusive.parse("form");

Option 3

var settings = $.data($('#myForm').get(0), 'validator').settings;
settings.ignore = ".input";

Option 4

 $("form").get(0).submit();
 jQuery('#createForm').unbind('submit').submit();

Option 5

$('input selector').each(function () {
    $(this).rules('remove');
});

Server Side

Create an attribute and mark your action method with that attribute. Customize this to adapt to your specific needs.

[AttributeUsage(AttributeTargets.All)]
public class IgnoreValidationAttribute : ActionFilterAttribute
{
    public override void OnActionExecuting(ActionExecutingContext filterContext)
    {
        var modelState = filterContext.Controller.ViewData.ModelState;

        foreach (var modelValue in modelState.Values)
        {
            modelValue.Errors.Clear();
        }
    }
}

A better approach has been described here Enable/Disable mvc server side validation dynamically

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AFAIK you can not remove attribute at runtime, but only change their values (ie: readonly true/false) look here for something similar . As another way of doing what you want without messing with attributes I will go with a ViewModel for your specific action so you can insert all the logic without breaking the logic needed by other controllers. If you try to obtain some sort of wizard (a multi steps form) you can instead serialize the already compiled fields and with TempData bring them along your steps. (for help in serialize deserialize you can use MVC futures)

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I was having this problem when I creating a Edit View for my Model and I want to update just one field.

My solution for a simplest way is put the two field using :

 <%: Html.HiddenFor(model => model.ID) %>
 <%: Html.HiddenFor(model => model.Name)%>
 <%: Html.HiddenFor(model => model.Content)%>
 <%: Html.TextAreaFor(model => model.Comments)%>

Comments is the field that I only update in Edit View, that not have Required Attribute.

ASP.NET MVC 3 Entity

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The cleanest way here I believe is going to disable your client side validation and on the server side you will need to:

  1. ModelState["SomeField"].Errors.Clear (in your controller or create an action filter to remove errors before the controller code is executed)
  2. Add ModelState.AddModelError from your controller code when you detect a violation of your detected issues.

Seems even a custom view model here wont solve the problem because the number of those 'pre answered' fields could vary. If they dont then a custom view model may indeed be the easiest way, but using the above technique you can get around your validations issues.

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If you don't want to use another ViewModel you can disable client validations on the view and also remove the validations on the server for those properties you want to ignore. Please check this answer for a deeper explanation http://stackoverflow.com/a/15248790/1128216

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What @Darin said is what I would recommend as well. However I would add to it (and in response to one of the comments) that you can in fact also use this method for primitive types like bit, bool, even structures like Guid by simply making them nullable. Once you do this, the Required attribute functions as expected.

public UpdateViewView
{
    [Required]
    public Guid? Id { get; set; }
    [Required]
    public string Name { get; set; }
    [Required]
    public int? Age { get; set; }
    [Required]
    public bool? IsApproved { get; set; }
    //... some other properties
}
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