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Is WM operating system protects process memory against one another? Can one badly written application crash some other application just mistakenly writing over the first one memory?

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3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Windows Mobile, at least in all current incarnations, is build on Windows CE 5.0 and therefore uses CE 5.0's memory model (which is the same as it was in CE 3.0). The OS doesn't actually do a lot to protect process memory, but it does enough to generally keep processes from interfering with one another. It's not hard and fast though.

CE processes run in "slots" of which there are 32. The currently running process gets swapped to slot zero, and it's addresses are re-based to zero (so all memory in the running process effectively has 2 addresses, the slot 0 address and it's non-zero slot address). These addresses are proctected (though there's a simple API call to cross the boundary). This means that pointer corruptions, etc will not step on other apps but if you want to, you still can.

Also CE has the concept of shared memory. All processes have access to this area and it is 100% unprotected. If your app is using shared memory (and the memory manager can give you a shared address without you specifically asking, depending on your allocation and its size). If you have shared memory then yes, any process can access that data, including corrupting it, and you will get no error or warning in either process.

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Is WM operating system protects process memory against one another?

Yes.

Can one badly written application crash some other application just mistakenly writing over the first one memory?

No (but it might do other things like use up all the 'disk' space).

Even if you're a device driver, to get permission to write to memory that's owned by a different process there's an API which you must invoke explicitly.

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While ChrisW's answer is technically correct, my experience of Windows mobile is that it is much easier to crash the entire device from an application than it is on the desktop. I could guess at a few reasons why this is the case;

  • The operating sytem is often much more heavily OEMed than Windows desktop, that is the amount of manufacturer specific low level code can be very high, which leads to manufacturer specific bugs at a level that can cause bad crashes. On many devices it is common to see a new firmware revision every month or so, where the revisions are fixes to such bugs.

  • Resources are scarcer, and an application that exhausts all available resources is liable to cause a crash.

  • The protection mechanisms and architecture vary quite a bit. The device I'm currently working with is SH4 based, while you mostly see ARM, X86 and the odd MIPs CPU..

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