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Looking for a non-case sensitive search using perl, So if a "!" is detected at the start of the line, a new sort begins (only on the section).

[test file]
! Sort Section
!
a
g
r
e
! New Sort Section
1
2
d
3
h

becomes,

[test file]
! Sort Section
!
a
e
g
r
! New Sort Section
1
2
3
d
h
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On my phone atm, I had a basic sort going but couldn't get the sections bits working –  user349418 Mar 20 '11 at 12:51
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Another one, using an output file. More importantly, not loading an entire file into memory:

use strict;
use warnings;
sub output {
    my( $lines, $fh ) = @_;
    return unless @$lines;
    print $fh shift @$lines; # print first line
    print $fh sort { lc $a cmp lc $b } @$lines;  # print rest
    return;
}
# ==== main ============================================================
my $filename = shift or die 'filename!';
my $outfn = "$filename.out";
die "output file $outfn already exists, aborting\n" if -e $outfn;
# prereqs okay, set up input, output and sort buffer
open my $fh, '<', $filename or die "open $filename: $!";
open my $fhout, '>', $outfn or die "open $outfn: $!";
my $current = [];
# process data
while ( <$fh> ) {
    if ( m/^!/ ) {
        output $current, $fhout;
        $current = [ $_ ];
    }
    else {
        push @$current, $_;
    }
}
output $current, $fhout;
close $fhout;
close $fh;
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I noticed the unix formated text file become dos formatted in the output, is there a fix (to keep orginal text format)? ..The script is run under win32 environment, Thanks for effort :) –  user349418 Mar 21 '11 at 0:22
    
The fix is to call binmode on the filehandle. –  Lumi Mar 21 '11 at 0:45
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Here's one way to do it:

use strict;
use warnings;
my $filename = shift or die 'filename!';
my @sections;
my $current;
# input
open my $fh, '<', $filename or die "open $filename: $!";
while ( <$fh> ) {
    if ( m/^!/ ) {
        $current = [ $_ ];
        push @sections, $current;
    }
    else {
        push @$current, $_;
    }
}
close $fh;
# output
for ( @sections ) {
    print shift @$_; # print first line
    print sort @$_;  # print rest
}
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Skipped the case-insensitive aspect. You could supply your sorting routine like this: print sort { lc $a cmp lc $b } @$_; # print rest –  Lumi Mar 20 '11 at 11:32
    
Does this save the output to the same filename (desired), also is it win32 compatible? –  user349418 Mar 20 '11 at 12:53
    
It prints the data to STDOUT, you can use redirection to write it where you want. You can also write the contents to a file by adding another call to open/close an output filehandle, possibly going to $inputfilename.out. I would strongly advise against clobbering the source file, though. If you want to put some renaming logic in there, too, Perl has the rename built-in. –  Lumi Mar 20 '11 at 13:31
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