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I'm trying to make a function which will display the top X results of the row Y which I set, for this instance I'm using the row browser and the top 5 results from my table statistics, the where is just to eliminate Search Bot results from showing up. I also want it to return the count of the amount of rows as well. So say there was 10 results for the browser 'Safari', then it would return the count of 10 for that result as well as the result itself.

$display->show_list('statistics', 'browser', '5', 'WHERE browser!=\'Search Bot\'');

Here is my function. I'm cleaned it up a bit to remove certain checks and outputs if the query were to fail, etc.

function show_list($table, $row, $limit = 5, $where = NULL) {

$item = mysql_query("SELECT DISTINCT $row FROM $table $where LIMIT $limit");

            $result = array();

while ($fetch = mysql_fetch_array($item)) {

            $result[] = $fetch;
}
            return $result;
}
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2  
... and the question is? –  Hogan Mar 20 '11 at 11:48
    
How would I go about doing what I described, as this currently doesn't output the count of the the occurrence of that particular row, which is what I desire it to do. –  paulwilde Mar 20 '11 at 11:51
    
if $where is ever = NULL as your function definition implies then your SQL statement will go south! –  Martin Mar 20 '11 at 11:52
    
What is it that you want to count? The number of rows that equal Safari for example? –  Martin Mar 20 '11 at 11:53
    
@Richard aka cyberkiwi I know, it should be '' because if it is null the SQL will look like: SELECT DISTINCT col_name FROM table null LIMIT 5 –  Martin Mar 20 '11 at 11:55

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Not sure I understand the question, but what about using a group by clause, in your SQL query :

select your_column, count(*)
from your_table
where ...
group by your_column
order by count(*) desc
limit 5

That would get you :

  • for each value of your_column,
  • the number of rows with that value
  • and you'd keep the 5 values of your_column that have the biggest number of rows
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Yeah sorry, forgot to actually ask the question, but you answered it either way and this works thanks. I used SELECT $row, COUNT(*) as amount FROM to determine the count of columns, which is what I wanted, but the group helped as well. –  paulwilde Mar 20 '11 at 12:00

Change this line:

$item = mysql_query("SELECT $row, count(*) as rows FROM $table $where GROUP BY count(*) ORDER BY count(*) DESC LIMIT $limit");

After doing that, you may not want to mix this with your generic show_list function.

A random note. DISTINCT tends to be somewhat expensive on the database. I would avoid defaulting to doing it.

Incidentally your indentation is..interesting. No decent programmer will want to work with that code without reformatting to some consistent indentation scheme. There are endless arguments about the best way to format, but the following would be a reasonable indentation of your original code:

function show_list($table, $row, $limit = 5, $where = NULL) {

    $item = mysql_query("SELECT DISTINCT $row FROM $table $where LIMIT $limit");

    $result = array();

    while ($fetch = mysql_fetch_array($item)) {    
        $result[] = $fetch;
    }
    return $result;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. Yeah, I agree my indentation isn't the best, I need to improve on it, and I agree yours is more readable. –  paulwilde Mar 20 '11 at 12:11
function show_list($table, $column, $limit = 5, $where = '') {
    $item = mysql_query("SELECT $column, COUNT(*) AS c FROM $table $where
            GROUP BY $column ORDER BY c LIMIT $limit");
    $result = array();
    while ($fetch = mysql_fetch_array($item)) {
        $result[] = $fetch;
    }
    return $result;
}
  • Replace row with column - we are actually passing a column name in the variable.
  • Replace $where = null with $where = '' - it will ensure that the query works correctly even when $where is null.
  • Modify the query to generate the expected results (to the best of my understanding of your question)
  • Re-format the code and indent it properly.
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