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i have this simple jquery function here.Clicking over a button i want to alert its own class before ajax and again upon succession..but the selector "$(this)" in the last situation is not working and the alert returns "undefined"..

why?

$(".button").live("click",function(){

alert($(this).attr('class')); //returns "button"
 $.ajax({
    type: "POST",
    url: myUrl,
    data: myData,
    cache: false,
    success: function(html)
    {
                alert($(this).attr('class')); //returns undefined

    }

});
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Wow, 7 answers in 10 minutes... –  mattsven Mar 20 '11 at 15:56
    
yeah, all basically identical –  jondavidjohn Mar 20 '11 at 16:00

7 Answers 7

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I would do it like this, store $(this) in a variable so you can use it throughout the function without having to perform a jQuery lookup every time, and you also will not have to depend on the scope to provide the correct element for $(this)

$(".button").live("click",function(){
    var button = $(this);
    alert(button.attr('class')); //returns "button"
    $.ajax({
        type: "POST",
        url: myUrl,
        data: myData,
        cache: false,
        success: function(html)
        {
            alert(button.attr('class')); //should also return "button"

        }
    });
});

wrapping this only once also is a performance enhancement

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This will make it work:

$(".button").live("click", function() {

    var button = this;

    $.ajax({
        type: "POST",
        url: myUrl,
        data: myData,
        cache: false,
        success: function(html) {
            alert($(button).attr('class')); 
        }
    });

});

You cannot use the this reference inside nested functions. The success function is a nested function and it has its own this value. If you need the reference to the button inside that nested function, you have to declare a local variable (like button).

function clickHandler() {

    // this == element that was clicked

    function ajaxHandler() {

        // this != element that was clicked 

    }

}
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Try adding var self = $(this); when you declare the function, and then use self instead of $(this)

So your code looks like this:

$(".button").live("click",function(){

var self = $(this);

alert($(this).attr('class')); //returns "button"
 $.ajax({
    type: "POST",
    url: myUrl,
    data: myData,
    cache: false,
    success: function(html)
    {
                alert(self.attr('class')); //returns undefined

    }
});
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ill try..but wich is the explanation?? –  luca Mar 20 '11 at 15:47
    
You're code is the exact same as the OP –  jondavidjohn Mar 20 '11 at 15:48

Lots of people have posted the solution for this so I won't post the code. Just wanted to mention the reason is because since the success method is a callback your context of $(this) isn't valid anymore. So you need to assign it to a variable and store it for your own use.

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$(this) only exists when referencing an HTML object in the DOM. Since you've tried using in the success function of the AJAX call, $(this) has no reference. So for example, in the following code $(this) refers to the item to returned by the jQuery selector:

$('.button').each(function() {
    alert($(this));
});

You will need to use a selector to return the item in global scope, and then pass this to the success function in the AJAX call:

var myButton = $('.button');

$.ajax({
    type: "POST",
    url: myUrl,
    data: myData,
    cache: false,
    success: function(html) { alert(myButton.attr('class')); /* returns button */ }
});
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Actually JQuery doesn't impose any meaning to this through out the API, for event handlers this points to the DOM object the event was triggered from, but from other APIs it points to the 'current' element (see $.each) and if it's hard to guess for JQuery then it will just point to the window object. –  CarlosZ Mar 20 '11 at 15:54

Take a look at the context section here. Basically, what seems to be happening in your code is that the reference to this no longer applies. Makes sense, given that the context of the code has moved on while the AJAX callback is being handled asynchronously. Explicitly setting the context to a particular object in the .ajax() call will carry a reference to the context into the callback function.

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You can either add a context: this property to the hash that is passed to the $.ajax call, that way the success handle will it's context set properly, or you can also do something like:

success: $.proxy(function(html) {  // using $.proxy will bind the function scope to this
    alert($(this).attr('class'));
}, this);

or, another technique I've seen:

$(".button").live("click",function(){
    var self = this;
    alert($(self).attr('class')); //returns "button"
    $.ajax({
        type: "POST",
        url: myUrl,
        data: myData,
        cache: false,
        success: function(html)
        {
                alert($(self).attr('class')); //returns undefined

        }
});
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