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I've got a setup with Ninject and NHibernate like this. Now, if I have this scenario..

class HomeController : Controller
{
 [Inject]
 public ISession Session { get; set; }

}

This works properly.

But if I make another class ...

class QueryObject
{
 [Inject]
 public ISession Session { get; set; }
}

// .. somewhere else in my program.
var test = new QueryObject().Execute();

The ISession is null! This is not just with ISession, it is with anything I try to inject.

Here is my SessionModule:

public class SessionModule : Ninject.Modules.NinjectModule
{
    private static ISessionFactory sessionFactory;

    public override void Load()
    {
        Bind<ISessionFactory>()
            .ToMethod(c => CreateSessionFactory())
            .InSingletonScope();

        Bind<ISession>()
            .ToMethod(c => OpenSession())
            .InRequestScope()
            .OnActivation(session =>
            {
                session.BeginTransaction();
                session.FlushMode = FlushMode.Commit;
            })
            .OnDeactivation(session =>
            {
                if (session.Transaction.IsActive)
                {
                    try
                    {
                        session.Transaction.Commit();
                    }
                    catch
                    {
                        session.Transaction.Rollback();
                    }
                }
            });
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Create a new <see cref="NHibernate.ISessionFactory"/> to connect to a database.
    /// </summary>
    /// <returns>
    /// A constructed and mapped <see cref="NHibernate.ISessionFactory"/>.
    /// </returns>
    private static ISessionFactory CreateSessionFactory()
    {
        if (sessionFactory == null)
            sessionFactory = Persistence.SessionFactory.Map
                (System.Web.Configuration
                    .WebConfigurationManager
                    .ConnectionStrings["Local"]
                    .ConnectionString
                );
        return sessionFactory;
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Open a new <see cref="NHibernate.ISession"/> from a <see cref="NHibernate.ISessionFactory"/>.
    /// </summary>
    /// <returns>
    /// A new <see cref="NHibernate.ISession"/>.
    /// </returns>
    private static ISession OpenSession()
    {
        // check to see if we even have a session factory to get a session from
        if (sessionFactory == null)
            CreateSessionFactory();

        // open a new session from the factory if there is no current one
        return sessionFactory.OpenSession();
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
NB in general a query object (as with entities in general) shouldnt have such dependencies in the first place – Ruben Bartelink Feb 20 '13 at 9:37
up vote 10 down vote accepted

It's working for controllers because you're instantiating them with Ninject (via the controller factory).

When you're doing new QueryObject().Execute(); your're not using Ninject to instantiate your QueryObject. The .NET framework itself has no knowledge of injecting properties.

You need to use the Ninject Kernel to resolve your QueryObject. Something like this should do it:

IKernel kernel = new StandardKernel(new SessionModule());
var queryObject = kernel.Get<QueryObject>();
queryObject.Execute();

The kernel will then instantiate a new QueryObject with all dependencies properly set.

For this to work, you'll have to register the QueryObject:

Bind<QueryObject>().ToSelf();

This tells Ninject to always return a instance of an QueryObject when you're doing kernel.Get<QueryObject>();

This is done in your SessionModule.

I recommend reading Modules and the Kernel from the docs. ≈

share|improve this answer
    
Is there a way to design a Non Service Locator pattern to have Ninject include things flagged with, say IInject in its injection? – Ciel Mar 20 '11 at 17:51
    
Yes, make sure everythings instantiated with Ninject from the beginning. Where are you using your QueryObject? – alexn Mar 20 '11 at 17:54
    
Nowhere, yet. I was trying to see if I could even get it to work before I started making anything real with it. I'm trying to design a Bus service/Message Handler system instead of a Repository pattern by encapsulating queries and commands for performance granularity. Unfortunately this won't work if I have to rely on a service locator pattern. And I read the entire Ninject docs already, it didn't really elude to this. – Ciel Mar 20 '11 at 17:57
    
There should not be a need for a service locator here. As long as you make sure Ninject instantiate your dependencies. I recommend using constructor injection. It's easier to help if you're able to show some code. – alexn Mar 20 '11 at 18:01
    
Thanks. I guess I can't do what I want with Ninject. I'm going to have to think of a different approach. – Ciel Mar 20 '11 at 18:02

You can do the following if you want to create the object yourself:

class QueryObject
{
  [Inject]
  public ISession Session { get; set; }
}

// .. somewhere else in my program.
var test = new QueryObject();
kernel.Inject(test);

Ninject will then try to fulfil your dependencies.

share|improve this answer
1  
And also, just a thing to be aware of with properties and the Inject attribute, Ninject cannot do the binding if the property is private. – Cloud9999Strife Sep 28 '13 at 12:35
    
Not 100% correct. By default it does not inject for privates but you can enable it on the ninject settings – Daniel Marbach Oct 2 '13 at 15:04

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