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I've got two classes: Alpha and Beta.

Beta inherits from Alpha.

How do I write a method in Alpha such that if I call it with an object of class Beta, it will return a new Beta object?

For example:

- (Alpha *)makeAnother {
  return [[[self class] alloc] init] autorelease];
}

I thought this would work, but it doesn't.

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1  
Can you elaborate on "doesn't work"? Does it not compile? Does it fail at runtime? Just asking because I checked and that code works fine as far as I can tell, properly instantiating Beta instances and all. –  ig2r Mar 20 '11 at 17:29
    
Yeah. The code works fine for me. Beta* x = [[Beta alloc] init]; Alpha* y = [x makeAnother]; [y methodB]; I get a compiler warning when I call a Beta method on an Alpha pointer, obviously, but it works. –  Vagrant Mar 20 '11 at 17:57
    
If this doesn't "work", then it has something to do with the way you are using the returned value, and we can't see that here. –  Vagrant Mar 20 '11 at 18:00

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Change the return type from Alpha* to id in this case. The rest of it is right.

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Not sure why, though? Since Beta derives from Alpha, Muchin's version looks fine to me (although I would have instinctively gone with id, too). Plus, I got the version with (Alpha*) to compile and run without a problem, so I suspect there's a different problem somewhere. –  ig2r Mar 20 '11 at 17:26
    
Nope, that's the problem. The problem is the compiler registers that method as returning an Alpha. Betas are Alphas, but Alphas are not Betas. Does this make sense? If not, perhaps a step backwards is in order on fundamentals of OO. The object you're returning is a Beta, but the runtime thinks it's an Alpha because that's what the compiler registered it as. –  jer Mar 20 '11 at 17:29
    
If that method is called on a Beta instance, the [[self class] alloc] part will/should instantiate another Beta object, but the point is that we never explicitly treat it as such. We only handle it as an Alpha, and since Beta derives from Alpha, that's perfectly fine polymorphic behavior on the OO front, and also okay with the return type of makeAnother? –  ig2r Mar 20 '11 at 17:37
3  
Returning an Alpha* is fine and more appropriate than returning (id). –  Vagrant Mar 20 '11 at 18:00
1  
Actually, returning id is correct for the same reason that +alloc returns (id). If you have Beta*b = [x makeAnother]; where you know x is a Beta, then you'll have to cast. Objective-C does not support contra-variant and co-variant arguments/return types. –  bbum Mar 20 '11 at 20:01

Not sure what you're trying to do here, when you use polymorphism the ultimate goal is to create the proper subclass, Beta, and it inherits all of the methods of superclass, Alpha. If you want to return an object of type Beta you should be declaring it in the Beta class.

If the issue is that you have circular dependencies, then you can semi-declare a needed but not yet declared class inside of another class by using this little trick:

@Class Beta;

It would help if you tried to describe exactly what you're trying to do with your code.

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The easiest way would be to write your alpha function:

- (Alpha *)makeAnother {
   return [[[Alpha alloc] init] autorelease];
}

and then overwrite that function in your beta class:

- (Alpha *)makeAnother {
   return (Alpha*)[[[Beta alloc] init] autorelease];
}
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- (Alpha *)makeAnother {
  return [[[self class] alloc] init] autorelease];
}

That code works fine. Without you defining what "doesn't work" means to you, hard to say more.

However, you should define the method as returning (id) if you are ever going to expect a pattern like this to work without casting:

Beta* b = [someObjectIKnowIsBeta makeAnother];

Objective-C doesn't support co/contra variance and, thus, any method that is expected to return instances of different classes is declared as returning (id) to avoid a cast. This is common across the frameworks. See -dataCell, +array, +alloc, etc...

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