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Here is my code, I casted the buffer to different type of objects, is this what causes the failure? I really want to know why the FromBase::find2(int key) works, but not FromBase::find(int key)?

class Base
{
 public:
        virtual int find(int key)=0;

        int keys[4];
};

class FromBase:public Base
{
 public:
       FromBase();
       int find(int key);
       int find2(int key);
};
FromBase::FromBase()
{
       for(int i=0;i<4;i++)
              keys[i]=-1;
}
int FromBase::find(int key)
{
       for(int i=0;i<4;i++){
              if(keys[i]==key)
                    return i;
       }
       return i;
};
int FromBase::find2(int key)
{
       for(int i=0;i<4;i++){
              if(keys[i]==key)
                    return i;
       }
       return i;
};

int main()
{
       FromBase frombase;
       FILE* fptr=fopen("object.dat","w");
       fwrite((void*)&frombase,48,1,fptr);
       fclose(fptr);

       char object[48];
       fptr=fopen("object.dat","r");
       fread((void*)object,48,1,fptr);

       // looks like this works
       (FromBase*)object->find2(7);

       //These two do not work, I got segmentation fault!
       (FromBase*)object->find(7); 
       (Base*)object->find(7);     
}

The reason I want to do this is because I need to read the object from a file, thus I need to cast the buffer to an particular type then I can call the mothod.

share|improve this question
    
Why use fopen instead of ifstream? –  Sam Miller Mar 20 '11 at 18:33
3  
This is really, really bad. This is not a good approach to object serialization. You may want to check out Boost.Serialization. –  Björn Pollex Mar 20 '11 at 18:34
    
Which compiler are you using? My gcc 4.0.1 refuses to compile this. –  Björn Pollex Mar 20 '11 at 18:38
    
I am using 4.4.3 –  baboonWorksFine Mar 20 '11 at 18:51
1  
This will never work in a portable stable way. You may get it to work (after correcting the obvious mistakes) but there is no guarantee that it will port to any other compiler (even a new/old version of gcc). Nobody in there right mind would ever let this pass a code review let alone be checked into a shared source control system. –  Loki Astari Mar 20 '11 at 19:28

6 Answers 6

up vote 3 down vote accepted

There is a high chance that you are overwriting the virtual function table with your code leading to a bad address when you call the method. You cannot just save objects into a file and expect to restore them by just restoring the memory content at the time they were saved.

There are some nice libraries like boost::serialization to save and restore objects. I would urge you to read about this or to turn your objects into plain old data types (structs) containing no references or addresses.

share|improve this answer
    
please check my code again, I am still wondering. I chose not to use boost, because I really want objects to be small, usually less than 48 bytes. –  baboonWorksFine Mar 20 '11 at 18:53
    
The error is really that the virtual function pointers cannot just be saved and restored (the addresses usually differ). One solution could be to store only the keys along with an Id to detect which type of object you will have to rebuild. (essentially what serialization frameworks do for you) That would also better be done from within the class to be serialized so you can make the members to serialize private and follow the traditional information hiding pattern. –  jdehaan Mar 31 '11 at 15:33

There are several reasons why this code is not guaranteed to work. I think the biggest concern is this code here:

char object[48];

The number 48 here is a magic number and there's absolutely no guarantee that the size of the object you're writing out is 48 bytes. If you want to have a buffer large enough to hold an object, use sizeof to see how many bytes you need:

char object[sizeof(FromBase)];

Moreover, this is not guaranteed to work due to alignment issues. Every object in C++ has an alignment, some number that its address must be a multiple of. When you declare a variable, C++ ensures that it has the proper alignment for its type, though there's no guarantee that it ends up having the alignment of any other type. This means that when you declare a char array, there's no guarantee that it's aligned the same way as a real FromBase object would be, and using the buffer as an object of that type results in undefined behavior.

As others have pointed out, though, you also have a problem because this line:

fopen("object.dat","r");

Doesn't update the local variable you're using to keep track of the file pointer, so what you're reading back is almost certainly going to be garbage (if you read back anything at all). The segfault is probably coming from the bytes for the virtual dispatch table not being read back in correctly.

share|improve this answer
// will these two methods work? I got segmentation fault!
(FromBase*)object->find(7); 
(Base*)object->find(7);     

No they will not work. The segmentation fault might be a hint ;)

object is a type on the stack, which is fine, but you need to call the class constructor. If this was valid c++, ANY memory could be casted to any class.

I'd start off by creating the class on the stack and call some Load()-method on it, e.g.

FromBase object;
object.Load("object.dat");

And let the Load()-method read the data from file and set values on the internal data.

share|improve this answer

Apart from all the other problems that people have pointed out.

I absolutely shocked that nobody has mentioned that:

(FromBase*)object->find2(7);

Is just NOT guaranteed to work.
You are depending on a raft of implementation details. object is an array of char! Not a FromBase thus the compiler has not had the chance to initialize any of its implementation dependent details.

Even if we assume that the implementation uses a vtable (and thus a vtable pointer in the class). Does the implementation use a relative pointer or an absolute pointer. Assuming you want to save with one run and then reload the next time? Are you assuming the vtable is actually located in the same location between different runs (what happens when you load this part of the application from a dynamic library)!

This is just horrible. You SHOULD NOT DO THIS EVER.

If you want to serialize and de-serialize the object from storage. Then the class has to know how to do the serialization itself. Thus all the correct constructors/destructors get called at the correct time.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, I agree, so instead of calling method, can I just use the data from object, for example, (FromBase*)object->keys[i], is this guaranteed to work? –  baboonWorksFine Mar 20 '11 at 19:30
    
NO NO NO NO. And NO! :) You need to call the CONSTRUCTOR on the class. Read my post. –  ralphtheninja Mar 20 '11 at 21:27
    
@baboonWorksFine: No nothing is guaranteed when you mess around with the data in binary format. The class must understand how to serialize and de-serialize itself. The fact that it is an array now saves you but a future version may use a vector. But then the binary saving will also completely fail. The Key is Serialization. –  Loki Astari Mar 21 '11 at 3:32
    
@baboonWorksFine; @Magnus Skog: Maguns is basically correct. You must make sure the implementation is allowed to construct and destruct the object (Though he should use the verbs 'Serialize'). Rather than the method Load() as he uses in his answer I would use operator << to load the data (but that is minor detail). BUT the concept is identical. –  Loki Astari Mar 21 '11 at 3:37

First problem I can see when you use fopen second time:

fopen("object.dat","r"); //problem - your code

which should be this:

fptr = fopen("object.dat","r"); //fix (atleast one fix)

That means, in your code you're trying to read data using fptr which is already closed!

share|improve this answer

One problem is that the array of characters do not have a method called find. The cast do not convert the array to FromBase or Base. It only tells the compiler to ignore the error.

share|improve this answer
    
I am not sure, the code is weired! –  baboonWorksFine Mar 20 '11 at 18:50

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