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The following sample (not compiled so I won't vouch for syntax) pulls two resources from resource pools (not allocated with new), then "binds" them together with MyClass for the duration of a certain transaction.

The transaction, implemented here by myFunc, attempts to protect against leakage of these resources by tracking their "ownership". The local resource pointers are cleared when its obvious that instantiation of MyClass was successful. The local catch, as well as the destructor ~MyClass return the resources to their pool (double-frees are protected by teh above mentioned clearing of the local pointers).

Instantiation of MyClass can fail and result in an exception at two steps (1) actual memory allocation, or (2) at the constructor body itself. I do not have a problem with #1, but in the case of #2, if the exception is thrown AFTER m_resA & m_resB were set. Causing both the ~MyClass and the cleanup code of myFunc to assume responsibility for returning these resources to their pools.

Is this a reasonable concern?

Options I have considered, but didn't like:

  • Smart pointers (like boost's shared_ptr). I didn't see how to apply to a resource pool (aside for wrapping in yet another instance).
  • Allowing double-free to occur at this level but protecting at the resource pools.
  • Trying to use the exception type - trying to deduce that if bad_alloc was caught that MyClass did not take ownership. This will require a try-catch in the constructor to make sure that any allocation failures in ABC() ...more code here... wont be confused with failures to allocate MyClass.

Is there a clean, simple solution that I have overlooked?

class SomeExtResourceA;
class SomeExtResourceB;

class MyClass {
private:
  // These resources come out of a resource pool not allocated with "new" for each use by MyClass
  SomeResourceA* m_resA;
  SomeResourceB* m_resB;

public:
  MyClass(SomeResourceA* resA, SomeResourceB* resB):
    m_resA(resA), m_resB(resB)
    {
       ABC(); // ... more code here, could throw exceptions
    }

  ~MyClass(){
    if(m_resA){
      m_resA->Release();
    }
    if(m_resB){
      m_resB->Release();
    }
  }
};

void myFunc(void)
{
  SomeResourceA* resA    = NULL;
  SomeResourceB* resB    = NULL;
  MyClass*       pMyInst = NULL;

  try {
    resA = g_pPoolA->Allocate();
    resB = g_pPoolB->Allocate();
    pMyInst = new MyClass(resA,resB);
    resA=NULL; // ''ownership succesfully transfered to pMyInst
    resB=NULL; // ''ownership succesfully transfered to pMyInst

    // Do some work with pMyInst;
    ...;

    delete pMyInst;

  } catch (...) {
    // cleanup
    // need to check if resA, or resB were allocated prior 
    // to construction of pMyInst.
    if(resA) resA->Release();
    if(resB) resB->Release();
    delete pMyInst;
    throw; // rethrow caught exception
  }
}
share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I don't see any leak in this small code.

If the constructor throws exception, then the destructor would not be called, since the object never existed. Hence I don't see double-delete either!

From this article by Herb Sutter :Constructor Exceptions in C++, C#, and Java:

  • constructor conceptually turns a suitably sized chunk of raw memory into an object that obeys its invariants. An object’s lifetime doesn’t begin until its constructor completes successfully. If a constructor ends by throwing an exception, that means it never finished creating the object and setting up its invariants — and at the point the exceptional constructor exits, the object not only doesn’t exist, but never existed.
  • A destructor/disposer conceptually turns an object back into raw memory. Therefore, just like all other nonprivate methods, destructors/disposers assume as a precondition that “this” object is actually a valid object and that its invariants hold. Hence, destructors/disposers only run on successfully constructed objects.

I think this should clear your doubts!

share|improve this answer
    
How about the potential to double-free due to exceptions thrown from ABC()? I guess I don't know if ~MyClass would be called here, but that should be easy enough for me to test. –  nhed Mar 20 '11 at 19:13
    
if ABC() throws, pMyInst should not be set (still NULL), so no double free that I can see. –  Mat Mar 20 '11 at 19:18
    
@nhed: Updated my answer! –  Nawaz Mar 20 '11 at 19:19
    
Thanks, so in this case I am missing a try-catch in the constructor, right? –  nhed Mar 20 '11 at 19:29
    
@nhed: In the constructor, not. You're using it at the calling site! –  Nawaz Mar 20 '11 at 19:34

Just put if (pMyInst) { ... } around release/delete code in your catch and you are fine.

share|improve this answer
    
whats in the braces? if its just the delete pMyInst then its unnecessary because delete NULL is a no-op. I could understand if it was if(!pMyInst) { /* release resA & resB */ }. –  nhed Mar 20 '11 at 19:34

The classic usage to explicitly take ownership is the std::auto_ptr

Something like this:

std::auto_ptr<SomeResourceA>(g_pPoolA->Allocate()) resA;
std::auto_ptr<SomeResourceB>(g_pPoolB->Allocate()) resB;
pMyInst = new MyClass(resA.release(),resB.release());

You transfer the ownership when you call the constructor.

share|improve this answer
    
I addressed smart/auto pointers in my question. the pointers returned by the pool's allocation cannot be returned to the pools with delete. –  nhed Mar 20 '11 at 19:38
    
Also ... Did I miss something? The resources are released in your example as your are constructing MyClass (or before) ... how does that transfer ownership? now both the resource pool AND my MyClass think they own the resource –  nhed Mar 20 '11 at 19:50
    
You can use the auto_ptr to just obtain ownership. Don't need to destroy it. Inside of MyClass destructor you can do m_ResA.release()->Release() –  ChrisWue Mar 20 '11 at 20:03
    
Forget my previous comment. The code above makes sure that resA and resB do not point to the object anymore after pMyInst was constructed. So it avoids the "resA and resB are not null after the constructor was called and threw an exception" scenario. But you question is already answered so your problem doesn't really exist. –  ChrisWue Mar 20 '11 at 20:10

Your code is fine. But to make it even better, use some kind of smart-pointer!

Edit: for example you can use shared_ptr:

class SomeExtResourceA;
class SomeExtResourceB;

class MyClass {
private:
  // These resources come out of a resource pool not allocated with "new" for each use by MyClass
  shared_ptr<SomeResourceA> m_resA;
  shared_ptr<SomeResourceB> m_resB;

public:
  MyClass(const shared_ptr<SomeResourceA> &resA, const shared_ptr<SomeResourceB> &resB):
    m_resA(resA), m_resB(resB)
    {
       ABC(); // ... more code here, could throw exceptions
    }
  }
};

void myFunc(void)
{
  shared_ptr<SomeResourceA> resA(g_pPoolA->Allocate(), bind(&SomeResourceA::Release, _1));
  shared_ptr<SomeResourceB> resB(g_pPoolB->Allocate(), bind(&SomeResourceB::Release, _1));
  MyClass pMyInst(resA,resB);

  // you can reset them here if you want, but it's not necessery:
  resA.reset(), resB.reset();

  // use pMyInst
}

I find this solution with RAII much simpler.

share|improve this answer
    
I would have to implement smart pointers from scratch, right? I can't use auto_ptr/shared_ptr as the resources cannot be returned to their respective pools with delete. –  nhed Mar 20 '11 at 19:40
    
@nhed: you can use shared_ptr with custom deleter. –  ybungalobill Mar 20 '11 at 20:12
    
I have not seen the custom deleter when I looked earlier at shared_ptr (and I previously only combed over 'bind', but it looks like a closure in other languages) –  nhed Mar 20 '11 at 20:53
    
@nhed: also if you don't want shared ownership but you have a C++0x compiler you can use unique_ptr (with custom deleter). –  ybungalobill Mar 20 '11 at 21:13

Here is your chance for a double call to release:

void func()
{
   MyClass   a(resourceA, resourceB);
   MyClass   b(a);
}

Whoops.

If you use an RIAA wrapper fro your resources you will be much less likely to make mistakes. Doing it this way is error prone. You are currently missing the copy constructor and assignment operator on MyClass that could potentially lead to a double call to Release() as shown above.

Because of the complexity of handling resource a class should only own one resource. If you have multiple resource delegate their ownership to a class that it dedicated to their ownership and use multiple of these objects in your class.

Edit 1

Lut us make some assumptions:

Resources are shared and counted. You increment the count with Acquire() and decrement the count with Release(). When count reaches zero they are automatically destroyed.

class ReferenceRapper
{ 
    ReferenceBase*   ref;
    public:
        ReferenceWrapper(ReferenceBase* r) : ref (r)  {/* Pool set the initial count to 1 */ }
       ~ReferenceWrapper()                            { if (ref) { ref->Release();} }

        /*
         * Copy constructor provides strong exception guarantee (aka transactional guarantee)
         * Either the copy works or both objects remain unchanged.
         *
         * As the assignment operator is implemented using copy/swap it also provides
         * the strong exception guarantee.
         */
        ReferenceWrapper(ReferenceWrapper& copy)
        {
            if (copy.ref) {copy.ref->Acquire();}
            try
            {
                if (ref) {ref->Release();}
            }
            catch(...)
            {
                if (copy.ref)
                {  copy.ref->Release(); // old->Release() threw an exception. 
                                        // Must reset copy back to its original state.
                }
                throw;
            }
            ref = copy.ref;
        }
        /* 
         * Note using the copy and swap idium.
         * Note: To enable NRVO optimization we pass by value to make a copy of the RHS.
         *       rather than doing a manual copy inside the method.
         */
        ReferenceWrapper& operator(ReferenceWrapper rhsCopy)
        {
            this->swap(rhsCopy);
        }
        void swap(ReferenceWrapper& rhs) throws ()
        {
            std::swap(ref, rhs.ref);
        }
        // Add appropriate access methods like operator->()
};

Now that the hard work has been done (managing resources). The real code becomes trivial to write.

class MyClass
{
        ReferenceWrapper<SomeResourceA>  m_resA;
        ReferenceWrapper<SomeResourceB>  m_resB;
    public:
        MyClass(ReferenceWrapper<SomeResourceA>& a, ReferenceWrapper<SomeResourceB>& b)
            : m_resA(a)
            , m_resB(b)
        {
           ABC();
        }
};

void myFunc(void)
{
  ReferenceWrapper<SomeResourceA> resA(g_pPoolA->Allocate());
  ReferenceWrapper<SomeResourceB> resB(g_pPoolB->Allocate());

  std::auto_ptr<MyClass>         pMyInst = new MyClass(resA, resB);


  // Do some work with pMyInst;
}

Edit 2 Based on comment below that resources only have one owner:

If we assume a resource has only one owner and is not shared then it becomes trivial:

  1. Drop the Release() method and do all the work in the destructor.
  2. Change the Pool methods so that the construct the pointer into a std::auto_ptr and return the std::auto_ptr.

Code:

class MyClass
{
        std::auto_ptr<SomeResourceA>  m_resA;
        std::auto_ptr<SomeResourceB>  m_resB;
    public:
        MyClass(std::auto_ptr<SomeResourceA>& a, std::auto_ptr<SomeResourceB>& b)
            : m_resA(a)
            , m_resB(b)
        {
           ABC();
        }
};

void myFunc(void)
{
  std::auto_ptr<SomeResourceA> resA(g_pPoolA->Allocate());
  std::auto_ptr<SomeResourceB> resB(g_pPoolB->Allocate());

  std::auto_ptr<MyClass>       pMyInst = new MyClass(resA, resB);


  // Do some work with pMyInst;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Sure, that's a whole new story though ... any suggestions? Should I prohibit the copy constructor? (create an explicit copy constructor that throws an exception?) –  nhed Mar 20 '11 at 19:45
    
@nhed: You should write a resource wrapper that does RIAA. Then MyClass should contain two objects of this resource wrapper. How you implement the wrapper depends on details I do not have like what Release() does what is supposed to happen when more than two objects have a reference to a resource. –  Loki Astari Mar 20 '11 at 19:51
    
These resources come from resource pools and should be held and used by a single owner (resource may have only one referencer - an external owner or the resource pool). RIAA seems to be reasonable but I grind my teeth (having spent most of my career with C, much of the stuff I see in C++ looks bloaty) –  nhed Mar 20 '11 at 20:17
    
@nhed: RIAA it actually makes the code a lot simpler. Because all the resource management is done in one place. Rather than repeated in every function that uses the object (Ala C). So the reduced size of MyClass and MyFunc when done properly. Also if you use boost a lot of the smart pointers will automatically handle most situations (even yours). Unfortunately you have not given enough details. But by the comment above all you need to do is make the resource pool return std::auto_ptr<> and everything else is done for you. –  Loki Astari Mar 20 '11 at 20:21
    
thanks ... yes using smart/auto ptrs with a wrapper was the first item in my "Options I have considered" in my original question... I guess its not too bad ... –  nhed Mar 20 '11 at 20:37

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