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C++ newbie here.

I am a science guy writing a cfd (ish) code. I have created a class for all solving functions, and one that handles operations on a grid. The grid class wants to be able to see a few of the variables stored in the solving class, as passing them all to the grid class seems like a bit of effort.

So in my research I came across friend classes, but can't seem to get it to work. Please see the fully cut back example below. Class A is the solver, and it creates a grid class B. Even though I have written friend class B, I still get the following compile error (g++):

In member function 'void B::testB()':

error: 'a1' was not declared in this scope

Here is the code:

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;
class B {
private:
    int b1;

public:
    void testB(){
        cout<<a1<<endl;
    };  


};

class A {
friend class B;

private:
    int a1;

public:
    void testA(){
        a1=2;
        B b;
        b.testB();
        };
};


int main(){
    A a;
    a.testA();
}
share|improve this question

7 Answers 7

up vote 3 down vote accepted

a1 only exists as a part of instances of class A. In other words, you need an A object in order to access a1.

EDIT: but it turns out that wasn't the only problem in the source you gave.

This works:

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

class B;

class A {
  friend class B;
  private:
    int a1;
  public:
    void testA();
};

class B {
private:
    int b1;

public:
    void testB(A *a){
        cout << (a->a1) << endl;
    }
};

void A::testA() {
    this->a1 = 2;
    B b;
    b.testB(this);
}


int main(){
    A a;
    a.testA();
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, this answer is exactly the one I was looking for. My experience with the this pointer was too limited to understand how to get it to work. However, why would you opt for this->a1 = 2; rather than simply a1=2? –  CptLightning Mar 20 '11 at 21:36
    
There's no difference between this-a1 = 2; and a1 = 2; I just like to qualify variables as much as possible. Now, I posted the code I did because it was the closest to what you posted, but what Nawaz posted is a bit better. You should always try to instantiate variables in constructors. It would be even better if you could find a way to avoid a friend class altogether. –  CromTheDestroyer Mar 20 '11 at 21:52

You are confused. friend-declarations are useful to gives a class or function access to a classes private or protected members. They are not necessarily what you want here. You probably just want B to have a reference to an A, like others have suggested:

class A;

class B {
public:
    B(A & a) : a(a) {}
private:
    A & a;
};

To enable B to access private or protected members of A, you have two options:

  1. Use a public accessor:

    class A {
    public:
        // You can also make this function returns a const reference
        int getItem() const { return item; }
    private:
        int item;
    };
    

    This way you do not need a friend declaration.

  2. Use a friend declaration.

You may want to read what the C++FAQ-Lite has to say about this.

share|improve this answer

This is how you should code this: (please read the comments!)

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

class A 
{
    friend class B; //this means, B can access private members of A!
private:
    int a1; //private member data

public:
    A (int a) : a1(a) {}
private:
    void testA() //private member function
    {
       cout << a1 << endl;
    }
};

class B {
    int b1;
public:
    void testB()
    {
        A a(100);
        cout<<a.a1<<endl; //B is accessing A's private member data!
        a.testA();        //B is accessing A's private member function!
    }
};    
int main(){
    B b;
    b.testB();
}

Online Demo : http://ideone.com/LDEOO

Read these tutorials:

share|improve this answer
    
I see how this works, but the the way you now create B from the main class rather than A has confused me a bit, and I don't now how to change it so that it works for my case. –  CptLightning Mar 20 '11 at 21:38
    
@CptLightning: There is nothing confusing. B has access to private members of A, since B is a friend of A. That is why I created an instance of B in main, so that I can demonstrate how B accesses what it has access to! –  Nawaz Mar 20 '11 at 21:42
    
@CptLightning: And if you create instance of A, then you would call testA which in turn would call testB so that B may have opportunity to access A's private members. This approach is a bit lengthy, as far as demonstrating friendship is concerned. So I avoided it. I don't see any point in calling testA from main! –  Nawaz Mar 20 '11 at 21:46

You need an instance of class B to access its members. Try

void testB(B *b){
    cout << b->a1 << endl;
};
share|improve this answer

You have to supply an object of which a1. Something like this:

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

class A {
friend class B;

private:
    int a1;

public:
    void testA();
};

class B {
private:
    int b1;

public:
    void testB(A &a){
        cout<<a.a1<<endl;
    }  
};

void A::testA(){
    a1=2;
    B b;
    b.testB(*this);
}


int main(){
    A a;
    a.testA();
}
share|improve this answer
2  
Type A is unknown until its definition. It will not compile. –  Maciej Ziarko Mar 20 '11 at 21:12
1  
You need to forward declare class A –  Mahesh Mar 20 '11 at 21:13
    
Actually you need to do far more then forward declare class A. I'll edit the post. –  Eelke Mar 20 '11 at 21:22

A.h

#ifndef A_H
#define A_H

class B;

class A
{
friend class B;

private:
    int a1;

public:
    void testA();
};
#endif

B.h

#ifndef B_H
#define B_H

#include <iostream>

#include "A.h"

class B
{
private:
    int b1;

public:
    void testB(A &a)
    {
        std::cout << a.a1 << std::endl;
    }
};
#endif

A.cpp

#include "A.h"
#include "B.h"

void A::testA()
{
    a1 = 2;
    B b;
    b.testB(*this);
}

main.cpp

#include "A.h"
#include "B.h"

int main()
{
    A a;
    a.testA();
}

g++ main.cpp A.cpp -o test

./test

prints:

2

Pieces of advice:

  • Try to divide your programs into many files, like I did. Headers and definitions should go in separate ones. It simplifies debugging, reading, using etc.
  • Never use using inside header files.
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, the way you describe is the format of my actual code, I changed it to the super compact version for my post. I can avoid doing this in future if this is not the norm. –  CptLightning Mar 20 '11 at 21:48

Since you said you're working on CFD, I think this question is on the wrong path. You should probably use something like Eigen / Lapack / Vtk libraries and follow the style there. Perhaps you can say why you need friend functions for interacting with your grid?

My similar tale: before I was good enough with c++, it was hard to make sense of big libraries and I wrote stuff like in your question. Now I reuse what's out there and only code the low level math stuff for new functionality. I suspect you're in a similar situation.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, it's not technically cfd, that's just the term I would use with a lay person. I'm doing a more simple vortex lattice method, and it is easier for me to code the basic grid operations myself. However, I do use Lapack as you suggest for my solving. –  CptLightning Mar 20 '11 at 21:52

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