Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've tried this:

if (argc > 2) {
  int i;
  for(i = 0; i < argc; i++) {
    if(i != 0) {
      rename_file(argv[i]);
    }
  }
}

if I pass in two file names only the first is renamed, whats wrong with this loop?

EDIT: Heres the rename_file function (it should work I think)

void rename_file(char const *filename) {
  struct tm *clock;
  struct stat attrib;
  const char *dot = strrchr(filename, '.');
  const char *ext = NULL;
  if (dot && *dot) {
      ext = dot + 1;
  }

  stat(filename, &attrib);

  clock = gmtime(&(attrib.st_mtime));

  char newname[250];
  if (!ext) {
    printf("ERROR: No File Extenstion");
  } else {
    sprintf(newname, "%02d_%02d_%02d.%s", clock->tm_mday, clock->tm_mon, clock->tm_year + 1900, ext);
  }

  rename(filename, newname);
}
share|improve this question
    
Do you get any error? Are you sure rename_file works correctly? Btw. you can omit the if statement and initialize i with 1. –  Felix Kling Mar 20 '11 at 21:12
    
Are you sure the problem is in the loop? –  Alin Purcaru Mar 20 '11 at 21:13
1  
It would be simpler if you initialised i to 1 and removed the if(i != 0) check. –  Lee Mar 20 '11 at 21:15
1  
To help diagnose what's going on, before the rename_file call add a line saying something like fprintf(stderr, "renaming: %s\n", argv[i]); and see whether you're getting a message for both the files you passed in. (Or, e.g., a single message that for some reason contains both filenames, or whatever.) I agree that the loop itself doesn't seem to have a bug that would cause the problem you describe. [EDITED to remove something redundant with an earlier comment added while I was writing that.] –  Gareth McCaughan Mar 20 '11 at 21:17
1  
not relevant to whatever your bug is, but please considering naming your files 'yyyy_mm_dd.ext' instead - that way they'll sort into the correct date order automatically. –  Alnitak Mar 20 '11 at 21:22

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Try this:

if (argc > 2) {
  for(int i = 1; i < argc; i++) {
      rename_file(argv[i]);
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
This should not make a difference. –  Felix Kling Mar 20 '11 at 21:14
    
that's certainly a bug, but it doesn't explain what he's seeing. –  Alnitak Mar 20 '11 at 21:14
    
I agree that errorhandler should be checking for argc >= 2 rather than argc > 2, but the problem s/he describes occurs in a situation where argc > 2 is actually true, so your proposal can't solve that problem. –  Gareth McCaughan Mar 20 '11 at 21:15
    
@muntoo: That depends on what the application is supposed to do. Now you changed your answer (before that, the only change was argc >= 2 instead of argc > 2, and this is what my comment referred to). Maybe it requires two arguments? You don't know! –  Felix Kling Mar 20 '11 at 21:17
3  
@errorhandler: This does exactly the same as your original code. If this works it just means your problem isn't happening all the time. –  Erik Mar 20 '11 at 21:32

I don't see a bug as such, but I do see a lot of redundancy in the code. You could just do this:

for (i = 1; i < argc; i++)
{
    rename_file(argv[i]);
}

If you don't have a debugger then you could add some debug printfs temporarily:

printf("argc = %d\n", argc);
for (i = 1; i < argc; i++)
{
    printf("i = %d, argv[i] = %s\n", i, argv[i]);
    rename_file(argv[i]);
}

This will let you see what's going on in the loop prior to each call to rename_file.

share|improve this answer

You're not checking the return value of rename. If you pass the name of two files created on the same date (and with same extension), the second will likely fail (this is depending on your c lib though). And, fix your loop as everyone else pointed out.

share|improve this answer

If your command line looks like this:

./renamestuff stuff.txt stuff.php

Then you probably want this:

for(int i = 1; i < argc; i++) {
    rename_file(argv[i]);
}
share|improve this answer
    
You don't even need the if (argc > 1) test. –  Paul R Mar 20 '11 at 21:22
    
Right. Edited out. –  vladh Mar 23 '11 at 9:59

The first element argv[0] contains the name of the executable itself. Therefore your loop should start with the first element.

share|improve this answer
    
why downvote him? it's correct! +1 from me –  BlackBear Mar 20 '11 at 21:16
    
that's what he does (testing against i == 0). Can be reworked of course but this answer does not address the question. –  Benoit Mar 20 '11 at 21:17
3  
perhaps because it's irrelevant and already accounted for (albeit poorly) in the OP's code? –  Alnitak Mar 20 '11 at 21:17
1  
@BlackBear: This does not seem to be a solution to the problem. Yes, the statement is true but that does not make it a useful answer. –  Felix Kling Mar 20 '11 at 21:18

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.