Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have been a project manager so far in a small company that focuses on PHP and .NET Development. No Java Development.

I learnt Java and J2EE 4 years back. I know things changed radically now. I would like to dive back to Java Enterprise Development. Can you guys tell me what the typical Development Environment is like in the big / small companies for Java / Java EE? Lot of friends who are in Java Development says, they use Spring and Hibernate.

What I would like to know is things like this...

  1. Eclipse or NetBeans IDE or some proprietary IDE? Do we get to choose the one we are comfortable with?
  2. Local or Remote Web and App Servers?
  3. I see that when I create a simple Java Project using eclipse, it adds some eclipse related tags / classes in the config files. Is this acceptable? And so on...

Hope my question makes sense...

Please shed some light. Thanks in advance!

share|improve this question

closed as off topic by krock, Robert Harvey Mar 20 '11 at 23:38

Questions on Stack Overflow are expected to relate to programming within the scope defined by the community. Consider editing the question or leaving comments for improvement if you believe the question can be reworded to fit within the scope. Read more about reopening questions here.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
This would be better asked on programmers.stackexchange.com (I'm out of flags at the moment) –  Brian Roach Mar 20 '11 at 23:17

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Eclipse or NetBeans IDE or some proprietary IDE? Do we get to choose the one we are comfortable with?

It depends. In a company I last worked for, they loved NetBeans while I preferred Eclipse (more configurable than NetBeans IMHO). NetBeans, however, is now owned by Oracle (formerly Sun) and thus comes with integrated Java EE packages to start with Development right away (includes GlassFish and Tomcat bundled). Eclipse Java EE doesn't include a webapp server.

Local or Remote Web and App Servers?

That totally depends on the company.

I see that when I create a simple Java Project using eclipse, it adds some eclipse related tags / classes in the config files. Is this acceptable? And so on...

These config files doesn't affect your project when exporting it to JARS/WAR/EAR, etc. Those config (.project, .classpath) are basically your project information Eclipse uses. NetBeans does the same. If these do affect your project when exporting, rather use Ant/Maven to build your project.

share|improve this answer
    
"These config files doesn't affect your project when exporting it to JARS/WAR/EAR, etc. Those config (.project, .classpath) are basically your project information Eclipse uses. NetBeans does the same. If these do affect your project when exporting, rather use Ant/Maven to build your projec" ==> Gives me very good info. Thanks much! –  Kevin Rave Mar 21 '11 at 0:02
  1. Eclipse or NetBeans IDE or some proprietary IDE?

IntelliJ from JetBrains is the best Java IDE out there. That's what my team uses.

  1. Do we get to choose the one we are comfortable with?

Depends on where you work. I think it makes sense to allow the workman to choose his/her tools.

  1. Local or Remote Web and App Servers?

We use Spring, so developers use Tomcat to deploy locally. The web servers exposed to the outside world are maintained by others; usually IIS or Apache. The app servers are JBOSS 5.

  1. I see that when I create a simple Java Project using eclipse, it adds some eclipse related tags / classes in the config files. Is this acceptable? And so on...

Your IDE should not add anything that you don't want. I personally don't care for Eclipse.

share|improve this answer
    
"We use Spring, so developers use Tomcat to deploy locally. The web servers exposed to the outside world are maintained by others; usually IIS or Apache. The app servers are JBOSS ". Thanks for the response. How does your team push the development to the App Server for the testing? –  Kevin Rave Mar 20 '11 at 23:57
    
The folks who own the servers do that. We don't have any access. We build using Cruise Control. When it's time to send a WAR/EAR, we tell them so. –  duffymo Mar 21 '11 at 0:02

You'll get as many answers as there are software companies.

I'll speak for mine:

  1. Eclipse
  2. Tomcat for local and remote
  3. I'm not sure what you mean here. Eclipse will definitely need .project and .classpath files if you want to share project, but I am not sure that it adds tags to config files.
share|improve this answer
    
You will see ".project" and ".classpath" files. One of these has "org.eclipse.jdt.launching.JRE_CONTAINERfiles". As you can see, eclipse reference. –  Kevin Rave Mar 20 '11 at 23:59
    
@Kevin. But these files are only used by Eclipse. They do not interfere with any other tools. In fact you can even build project from command line if you want to and these files will be ignored. –  Alexander Pogrebnyak Mar 21 '11 at 13:35

Definitely look into maven for builds, using it makes your projects ide-agnostic, and you can have people using eclipse or netbeans or whatever is their favorite and still be able to contribute.

share|improve this answer

The ones that are used in the Java shops around here are mostly Eclipse, with the latest version of Netbeans gaining popularity. Personally I find Eclipse to be decent and meets my needs, but YMMV

share|improve this answer

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.