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I'm trying to transform a hash definition which is stored in a string to an actual hash. This works out great with the eval() function.

I want to however to have the possibility to trap errors when an faulty hash definition is stored in the string.

Why can't I catch/trap the error which occurs in line 9?

#!/usr/bin/perl
use warnings;
use strict;

my $good_hash = "( 1 => 'one', 2 => 'two')";
my $bad_hash = "[ 1 => 'one', 2 => 'two')";

eval{my %string = eval($good_hash)} or &error;
eval{my %string = eval($bad_hash)} or &error;


sub error(){
        print "error\n";
}
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5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The eval operation can throw either errors or warnings. The error messages from eval are stored in the $@ variable. If there was no error thrown , $@ will be an empty string. However, warning messages are not stored in the $@ variable. You can process the warnings by using $SIG{__WARN__}.

I think in your case, eval is throwing warnings. One way of handling it would be by doing something like this:

#!/usr/bin/perl
use warnings;
use strict;

BEGIN { $SIG{'__WARN__'} = sub { error ($_[0]); }}

my $good_hash = "( 1 => 'one', 2 => 'two')";
my $bad_hash = "[ 1 => 'one', 2 => 'two')";

eval{my %string = eval($good_hash)}; error($@) if ($@);
eval{my %string = eval($bad_hash)};  error($@) if ($@);


# sub error will be called both in case of errors and warning.
sub error
{
    my ($msg ) = @_;
        print "Error/ warning message - $msg\n";
}

This is simplistic code example and can be improved based on your requirement.

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Thank you Shalini. This looks like it's doing the job too. –  jay_t Mar 21 '11 at 20:59

You can't catch the "error" because it's just a warning, not an error.

Do you have to use a Perl hash, or can you use json, xml, or even Storable to store the data?

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That makes perfectly sense indeed this is a warning produced by the 'use warnings' ... Thanks for making that clear. I also followed your advice to use json instead. –  jay_t Mar 21 '11 at 20:57

An easier way to visualise this is to remember that eval executes an expression or code block. Giving it a complete expression makes things a little bit easier to understand:

#!/usr/bin/perl
use warnings;
use strict;

my $good_hash = "\%string = ( 1 => 'one', 2 => 'two')";
my $bad_hash  = "\%string = [ 1 => 'one', 2 => 'two')";

my %string;

eval $good_hash;
if ($@) {
  error("can't process good_hash: $@");
}

eval $bad_hash;
if ($@) {
  error("can't process bad_hash: $@");
}

sub error {
  my $msg = shift;
  print "error: $msg\n";
}

Note the pre-declaration of %string, how the two strings contain complete perl expressions and how we look at $@ to see what the actual error was.

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Your error sub should print "error $@" because $@ (aka $EVAL_ERROR via English) tells you what error made the eval end. You can't just print out a string "error" and expect Perl to know that you want to print an error.

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I recommend that you use a regex to test the string before eval-ing it

something like:

if($hash =~ /^\((\s?[a-z0-9]+\s?=>\s?'[a-z0-9]*'\s?,?)*\)$/){
eval{my %string = eval($hash)};
} else {&error;}

This should also help to prevent invalid inputs from being executed which may cause bad things to happen on your system....

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I dont think regexes are appropriate to check perl code for validity. Furthermore you dont even try to answer the question. –  matthias krull Mar 21 '11 at 9:44

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