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I'm working on a problem which requires me to copy a binary search tree recursively and to return the tree. I am coding in the binary search tree class, so it will copy whatever binary search tree it is called on. The requirements say that the private method must have a return type of Entry<E> and a parameter of type Entry<E>. The problem I'm running into is getting multiple entries added to the tree.

Here is what I currently have:

public BinarySearchTree<E> rcopy(){
   BinarySearchTree newTree = new BinarySearchTree();
   newTree.add(rcopy(root).element);
   return newTree;
}


private Entry <E> rcopy(Entry <E> current){
   if(current.left!=null) return rcopy(current.left);
   if(current.right!=null) return rcopy(current.right);
   return current;
}

And here is Entry class so you know what I have available to me:

protected static class Entry<E> {
    protected E element;
    protected Entry<E> left = null,
                       right = null,
                       parent;
    protected int  pos;
protected Entry<E> link = null;
public Entry() { }
    public Entry (E element, Entry<E> parent) 
{
       this.element = element;
       this.parent = parent;
    }
}
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n00b - re: your proposed edit: you can post an answer to your own question, rather than editing someone else's answer. –  Jon B Mar 22 '11 at 16:49
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2 Answers 2

private Entry <E> rcopy(Entry <E> current){
   if(current.left!=null) return rcopy(current.left);
   if(current.right!=null) return rcopy(current.right);
   return current;
}

This will not copy anything. It will return the left-most ( or right-most, if no left child; or current, if it is a leaf node ) child of the current node. Because you always return current. You need somelthing like:

private Entry <E> rcopy(Entry <E> current){
    if (current == null) return null;
    return new Entry <E> (current.element, rcopy(current.left), rcopy(current.right)); //write a constructor for that
 }

and actually copy the nodes. I haven't tested the code and it is bit late, hope it is still correct.

Is there a reason you distinguish between BinarySearchTree<E> and Entry<E>? Isn't a part of the tree also a tree?

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It looks like your code could work except its not what my instructor is looking for. I only am allowed to edit the rcopy() methods. –  n00bz Mar 21 '11 at 2:14
    
@n00b: So, create a new entry for the node, copy the recursively for the left and right subtrees, and add them to your node. Same principle, and doable only inside the rcopy method. –  Paŭlo Ebermann Mar 21 '11 at 2:58
    
Of course we could provide you the solution you need, but then you would learn nothing. Try adapt the sample to your needs. And if you get stuck you can still ask again. Maybe you want to read this article: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tree_traversal –  paztulio Mar 21 '11 at 9:34
    
I am getting curious about your actual task. Why do you copy the tree? Besides showing students how to do tree traversal, I do not see a good reason to copy a search tree. I can not look at what you wrote, but my example above will not copy current.element, but just reference it. Normally, this is exactly what you want to do. In Java, everything is by-reference by default. Only primitive types (int, float, bool) are copied by-value. –  paztulio Mar 21 '11 at 14:33
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Just thought I would share the solution that I got. My main problem was not doing a deep copy on the object so, it would reference the object instead of creating a new one.

public BinarySearchTree<E> rcopy(){
   BinarySearchTree<E> newTree = new BinarySearchTree<E>();
   newTree.root = rcopy(root);
   newTree.size=newTree.nodes();
   return newTree;
}
private Entry <E> rcopy(Entry <E> current){
   Entry <E> b=new Entry<E>();
   if(current!=null){
      if(current.left!=null)b.left=rcopy(current.left);
      if(current.right!=null)b.right=rcopy(current.right);
      b.element = current.element;
      b.parent = successor(current);
   }
   return b;
}

(successor is a method that returns an entry of the object that preceeds it) Thank you every one for help with the problem!

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