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I'm curious if static methods of wrapper classes are really helpful.

Which of them are most useful and popularly used? Can you present any must-know tricks involving these methods?

Thanks in advance.

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You mean like Integer.parseInt? –  Gabe Mar 21 '11 at 0:54
    
For example. Are there any other interesting and worth-mentioning? I see Java offers quite a lot of them, even Boolean type has them :) –  Maciej Ziarko Mar 21 '11 at 0:55
    
Lots of useful ones.... why do you ask? –  MeBigFatGuy Mar 21 '11 at 1:51
    
Wrapper methods made me curious. I have C++ background, so it's a new thing to me. I wanted to know if I should be familiar with some of them to be effective. If you know any other nice usages, share with us :) –  Maciej Ziarko Mar 21 '11 at 8:36
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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The compare methods are useful to handle the primitive counterparts.

static int  compare(primitive p1, primitive p2) 
          Compares the two specified primitive values.

Possible use:

@Override
public int compareTo(MyClass other){
    return Double.compare(this.myDoubleField, other.myDoubleField);
}
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Never used this, it must be new. (Hmm, since 1.4. I'm old.) –  Paŭlo Ebermann Mar 21 '11 at 2:50
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Integer.parseInt(..) is used a lot. I don't have statistics though. I've used half of them, but of course they are all useful in certain contexts.

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Integer.toString(...) is used for turning an integer to string without resorting to "" + i.

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You can also write String.valueOf(...) (which supposedly delegates to this method) - this works for every type, even for null. –  Paŭlo Ebermann Mar 21 '11 at 2:48
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