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The ordinal() method can get the ordinal of a enum instance. How can I set the ordinal for a enum ?

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5 Answers

up vote 31 down vote accepted

You can't set it. It is always the ordinal of the constant definition. See the documentation for Enum.ordinal():

Returns the ordinal of this enumeration constant (its position in its enum declaration, where the initial constant is assigned an ordinal of zero). Most programmers will have no use for this method. It is designed for use by sophisticated enum-based data structures, such as EnumSet and EnumMap.

And actually - you should not need to. If you want some integer property, define one.

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If I can specify the ordinal of enum, when use JPA with enum, that will be more safe... –  Keating Wang Mar 21 '11 at 14:18
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You can control the ordinal by changing the order of the enum, but you cannot set it explicitly like in C++. One workaround is to provide an extra method in your enum for the number you want:

enum Foo {
  BAR(3),
  BAZ(5);
  private final int val;
  private Foo(int v) { val = v; }
  public int getVal() { return val; }
}

In this situation BAR.ordinal() == 0, but BAR.getVal() == 3.

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+1 except this isn't a workaround, really. it's desired behavior. the ordinal value is considered an implementation artifact; if you want to assign an integer or other value, that's what "enums are clases" is so great... –  andersoj Mar 21 '11 at 1:43
1  
wouldnt BAR.ordinal() return 0 afaik enum indexes are zero based –  Terraego Mar 10 '12 at 14:59
    
@Terraego Good catch. –  Matt Mar 14 '12 at 4:33
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The easy answer: just change the order of the constants. The first defined will be 0, the second will be 1, etc. However, this may not be practical if you have constantly changing code, or enums will many many values. You can define a custom method to work around the default ordinal, but MAKE SURE it is well documented to avoid confusion!

public enum Values
{
    ONE, TWO, THREE, FOUR;

    public int getCustomOrdinal()
    {
        if(this == ONE)
        {
            return 3;
        }
        else if(this == TWO)
        {
            return 0;
        }
        ...
    }
}
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+1: A switch statement might be better than a series of if-else statements. –  Peter Lawrey Mar 21 '11 at 7:44
    
I dislike this solution. Enums are classes and therefore can contain custom properties. I'd rather properly define a field for this and a corresponding getter method. –  Atmocreations May 21 at 9:04
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Check out the Java Enum examples and docs

Returns the ordinal of this enumeration constant (its position in its enum declaration, where the initial constant is assigned an ordinal of zero). Most programmers will have no use for this method. It is designed for use by sophisticated enum-based data structures, such as EnumSet and EnumMap.

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From http://download.oracle.com/javase/1.5.0/docs/api/java/lang/Enum.html

public final int ordinal()Returns the ordinal of this enumeration constant (its position in its enum declaration, where the initial constant is assigned an ordinal of zero). Most programmers will have no use for this method. It is designed for use by sophisticated enum-based data structures, such as EnumSet and EnumMap.

Returns: the ordinal of this enumeration constant

If you have

public enum Day { SUNDAY, MONDAY, TUESDAY, WEDNESDAY, THURSDAY, FRIDAY, SATURDAY }

then SUNDAY has an ordinal of 0, MONDAY is 1, and so on...

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ortinal is not guaranteed to give the ordering above! –  claj Jan 10 at 14:02
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