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class a
{
    public function __construct()
    {
        $this->id = 123;
    }
}

class b extends a
{
    public function __construct()
    {
        echo parent::id;
    }
}

How do I pass variables that are set in the first class $this to the second class?

share|improve this question
    
you may not able to use parent::id; in this case since its not a static property in the parent class. – Shameer Mar 21 '11 at 4:32

The correct way is to simply use $this->id in your subclass. All public/protected variables are available to subclasses this way. By assigning $this->id without declaring it, you've implicitly made it public. Generally you should explicitly declare the variable in the base class to document your intent to make it public:

class a
{
    public $id;

    public function __construct()
    {
        $this->id = 123;
    }
}

Just remember to call parent::__construct() before you attempt to access members set by the parent class. Unlike some languages (C++) the parent class's constructor will not be automatically invoked for you.

class b extends a
{
    public function __construct()
    {
        parent::__construct();
        echo $this->id;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 nice to have same idea like someone more experienced, and... faster :) – bensiu Mar 21 '11 at 2:31
1  
No reason to make it public. Otherwise good. – Matthew Flaschen Mar 21 '11 at 2:34
    
@Matthew There is no reason not to make it public; access specifies were not the subject of the question. – meagar Mar 21 '11 at 2:36
    
The reason is the same as always, don't make accessibility broader than necessary. There is no indication the id is needed outside the class. I didn't claim that was the main question. – Matthew Flaschen Mar 21 '11 at 2:39
    
@Matthew I would consider that quite tangential; I could also have given the classes better names and defined getter/setter methods, as long as we are going out of our way to write a "correct" 8 line snippet. This would in no way have made the answer clearer for the novice asking the question. – meagar Mar 21 '11 at 2:43

You can use parent::__construct() to get things that are initialized in the parent class. If you don't have anything to initialize in the child class you can avoid __construct() in the child class and it will automatically take the parent construct.

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