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If you have worked with DotNetNuke, what are advantages and disadvantages that you have come across? What are alternative Content Management Systems that you have used that you find are better or worst. I'm trying to get a feel of what Content Management System Frameworks people are using and the advantages and disadvantages of them.

Thanks, XaiSoft

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closed as primarily opinion-based by TLama, greg-449, Emile, Frédéric Hamidi, Jackson Feb 20 at 10:44

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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This post may help as it has covered some of this info!

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Thanks! I just finished reading that. –  Xaisoft Feb 11 '09 at 15:40

.Net Nuke is not good for developing projects. Microsoft is releasing lot of versiond and including lot of lauguages.

So how developers will learn all the things...

This is very bad for developers.....

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DNN is very very dynamic in terms of functionality, features and security. There's is nothing like it. However there are a few drawbacks that i felt while using it.

The biggest drawback in my opinion is the response time of a DNN using sites. The code itself is very obsolete and you need to lock yourself and scour on each and every coding details before using DNN. One more is the URL dependency, if you need to change your domain name to another your old database will be of no use.

There are a lot of new promising CMS extension in Dot NET market and Sageframe, in my opinion, is the best of them. I have been using this extension for quite a time now and I am quite fascinated by its features though still in beta.

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I agree with You .I have also been using sageframe and found it flexible and promising with quite fascinating features. –  El Amor Zeewon Apr 11 '12 at 12:16

The biggest disadvantage is the missing support for multiple languages. Yes, you can install multiple languages but you can't write seperate content for each installed language...

It's not hard to write such a module yourself but the other problem is the URLs. You can use the 'Human Friendly' option but yet again, this does not support multiple languages.

For instance /Products/tabid/57/language/en-US/Default.aspx becomes products.aspx but there isn't a possibility to include the language like this /en-US/products.aspx

I know there are 3th party tools like UrlMaster which covers this up but still I think this should be available in such a framework.

The biggest advantage is the ease of developing your own modules! If a functionality isn't available, you can write your own module without any problems!

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DotNetNuke is quite powerful. It's biggest advantage is the inline editing of site content, in my opinion. It's biggest disadvantage is that it is pretty resource intensive compared to other CMS systems.

Here's a comparison I wrote last month:

http://www.logicalvue.com/blog/2009/01/cms-shootout-dotnetnuke-vs-joomla-vs-wordpress/

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What about drupal? –  Xaisoft Feb 11 '09 at 19:01
    
I've never used drupal so I couldn't comment on it. –  Paul Lefebvre Feb 11 '09 at 22:28
    
I have used DNN and Wordpress a lot. I tried drupal and did not like it at all. After about a week of working through it, I switched the site to wordpress. DNN is the most intuitive CMS in my opinion. I have also used joomla a long time ago. DNN seems to trump them all. –  Jarrod Aug 8 '11 at 20:02

DotNetNuke works well, and has a wide variety of addins that are available for purchase from various vendors. It is also open source which is nice, as it allows you to troubleshoot issues to a deeper level then if it was closed source.

We didn't spend a lot of time researching CMS systems but this past summer we couldn't find anything with the functionality of DotNetNuke which targets the .net framework. If your not tied to .net then there are a ton of options available.

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