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When I say a grid, I mean a multidimensional array. I want this because I am making a 2D game and I want to be able to load levels from data text files. Lets say, for example, I have this 2D array level[3][3]. A simple 3x3 map. And I also have a text file that reads:

1 2 3 
4 5 6
7 8 9

In c++, I can simply do:

for (x=0; i<map_width; x++)
{
    for (y=0; y<map_height; y++)
    {
        fscanf(nameoffile, "%d", map[x][y]);
    }
}

And that would put all the contents of the text file accordingly into the array. HOWEVER I have no idea how to do this in java. Is there any sort of equivalent that will just place the data into the array accordingly? I already know about the scanner class, but I don't know how to use it. I have searched google, to no avail. It doesn't explain much. Please help! Specifically, I want to know how to scan the file and put whatever int it reads IN THE APPROPRIATE PLACE in the array.

My current code is this, however, it throws a NoSuchElementException:

public void loadMap() {
    Scanner sc = null;
    try {
        sc = new Scanner(inputmap);
    } catch (FileNotFoundException e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
    }
    for (int x = 0; x < width; x++) {
        for (int y = 0; y < height; y++) {
            map[x][y] = sc.nextInt();
        }
    }

Where inputmap is the file, map[][] is a grid of data for each of the tiles on the map and width and height are pre-specified in a constructor.

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pls do accepts the answers from our SO experts.. –  Mohamed Saligh Mar 21 '11 at 3:53
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2 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Your question is very unhelpful when it comes to how your text files will be actually formatted. For example,

123 
456
789

is very different from

1 2 3
4 5 6
7 8 9

and furthermore, you haven't mentioned whether they are always ints, or

1 2 3
4 5 6
a b c

etc. If you gave us a precise description of exactly what goes in these text files we could help you more. The best I can do is show you how to use Scanner to input stuff in general:

The for loop would look similar in Java, but you have to initialize a Scanner object.

Scanner input = new Scanner(myFile); //whatever file is being read

for (x=0; i<map_width; x++)
{
    for (y=0; y<map_height; y++)
    {
        int nextTile = input.nextInt(); //reads the next int
        // or
        char nextTile = input.nextChar(); //reads the next char
    }
}

Beyond that, I would need to know more about what is actually inside these input files.

EDIT:

I copied your for loop directly from your code, but you may want to swap the inner and outer for loops. Shouldn't the width be the inner parameter (reading left to right)?

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They are only ints, each number corresponds to a different tile. They are formatted with no spaces at all, and no extra blank lines between lines. Like this-123 456 789 Spaces indicating the next line in the file. –  Keelx Mar 21 '11 at 3:44
    
as long as they are spaced out, and the file is formatted properly (number of ints per row is same as width, etc) input.nextInt() will read them all sequentially. –  donnyton Mar 21 '11 at 3:47
    
That is it! Thank you so much! I just had to add spaces in between the numbers in the file. I did a test and it works perfectly! –  Keelx Mar 21 '11 at 3:50
    
@Keelx, welcome to SO. A customary thank you gift is to upvote and/or accept an answer. –  Michael Brewer-Davis Mar 21 '11 at 4:13
    
Hey, except now it makes my applet get a gray screen with no errors... And I know it has nothing to do with file loading, because it loaded an image just fine. –  Keelx Mar 21 '11 at 5:39
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In Java, it works similar - create a java.util.Scanner object for your file and use it's nextInt method instead of fscanf.

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